A Celebration of Women Writers


[Cover]

The Golden Book
OF
FAVORITE SONGS

A Treasury of the Best Songs of our People

"'TIS THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER OH!
LONG MAY IT WAVE O'ER THE LAND
OF THE FREE AND THE HOME OF
THE BRAVE"

HALL & McCREARY COMPANY
CHICAGO



[Title Page]

THE
GOLDEN BOOK
OF
FAVORITE SONGS

With Words and Music
of Songs for all Occasions
also Song Histories

A Treasury of the Best Songs of Our People
Compiled and edited by
N. H. AITCH.

TENTH EDITION

Price: 15 cents a copy.

HALL & McCREARY COMPANY
CHICAGO

Copyright, 1915, by Hall & McCreary.


[Table of Contents]

CONTENTS.

  Page
All Together 96
America 3
America, the Beautiful 91
Angry Words 113
Annie Laurie 66
Anvil Chorus 12 and 13
Auld Lange Syne 57
   
Battle Cry of Freedom, The 45
Battle Hymn of the Republic 63
Bees, The 32
Bell Doth Toll, The 83
Bingo Was His Name 126
Blest Be the Tie That Binds 90
Blue-Bells of Scotland, The 65
Blue-Eyed Mary 72
Bull-Dog, The 78
   
Can a Little Child, Like Me 84
Carry Me Back to Old Virginny 122 and 123
Catch the Sunshine 54 and 55
Cheer, Boys, Cheer 94 and 95
Christmas Carol 80
Christmas Carol 101
Christmas Song, A 102
Christmas Song 104
Christmas Time Is Come Again 97
College Days 115 and 116
Columbia, The Gem of the Ocean 70 and 71
Come, Thou Almighty King 87
Come, With Thy Lute 36 and 37
Comin' Thro' the Rye 57
Commencement Hymn, A 5
Cousin Jedediah 79
Cradle Song 69
Cuckoo, The 128
   
Darling Nellie Gray 44
Dearest Spot, The 38
Dip, Boys, Dip the Oar 48 and 49
Dixie Land 64
Donkey, The (Four Part Round) 32
   
Evening Bell, The 45
   
Fair Harvard 116 and 117
Farmer, The 73
Flag of the Free 53
Flow Gently, Sweet Afton 59
Follow Me, Full of Glee 111
   
Glad Christmas Bells 30 and 31
Go to Sleep, Lena Darling 34
God Be With You Till We Meet Again 86 and 87
God Bless Our Native Land 123
Gone are the Days 107
Good Morning To You 81
Good Night, Ladies 46
Graduation Song 105
   
Hail Columbia 42
Hail to the Chief 28
Hallelujah Chorus 10 and 11
Hand Exercise Song 7
Happy Greeting To All 88 and 89
Hark the Herald Angels Sing 80 and 81
Harrow Marches Onward All 16 and 17
Heart Bowed Down, The 75
Ho, Ho, Vacation Days are Here 25
Holy, Holy, Holy 88
Holy Night 114
Home Sweet Home 73
Hop, Hop, Hop 50
How Can I Leave Thee44
   
I Cannot Sing The Old Songs 18
If You Have a Pleasant Thought 42
Illinois 121
Imitation Song 7
In the Gloaming 68
I Think, When I Read That Sweet Story 92 and 93
   
Jesus, Lover of My Soul 14
Jesus Loves Me 42
Jingle Bells 82 and 83
John Brown's Body 110
Jolly Old St. Nicholas 4
Juanita 38 and 39
Just Before The Battle, Mother 37
   
Kathleen Mavourneen 74 and 75
Keller's American Hymn 15
Killarney 127
Kind Words Can Never Die 86
   
Largo 118 119 and 120
Last Night the Nightingale Woke Me 22
Last Rose of Summer, The 51
Lead, Kindly Light 65
Lead Us, Heavenly Father, Lead Us 120
Lilly Dale 36
Little Boy Blue 30
Little Drops of Water 23
Loch Lomond 35
Long, Long Ago 40
Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing 84
Loreley, The 33
Love's Old Sweet Song 41
Loving Kindness 92
   
Marching Through Georgia 128
March of the Men of Harlech 103
Marseillaise Hymn 77
Mary Had a Little Lamb 20 and 21
Massa's In The Cold Ground 48
Merrily, Merrily (Round) 22
Michigan, My Michigan 29
Miller of the Dee 17
Minstrel Boy, The 19
Motion Song–Our Flag 6
Musical Alphabet 83
My Bonnie 43
My Faith Looks Up To Thee 91
My Maryland 46
My Old Kentucky Home 60
My Own Native Land 23
   
Now Thank We All Our God 112
Now The Day Is Over 15
   
O, Come, Come Away 125
Oh, Broad Land 50
Oh, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast 47
Old Black Joe 54
Old Folks at Home 56
Old Oaken Bucket, The 55
Old Santa Claus 100
Onward, Christian Soldiers 76
   
Praise for Peace 124 and 125
   
Quilting Party, The 62
   
Rainy Day, The 32
Raise Your Hands 115
Revolutionary Tea 109
Robin Adair 40
Robin Redbreast 98
Robinson Crusoe 106
Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep 39
   
Safely Through Another Week 4
Sailing 27
Scenes That Are Brightest 72
Scotland's Burning (Round) 55
Singing In The Rain 99
Snow-Bird, The 106 and 107
Softly Now the Light of Day 6
Soldier's Farewell, The 43
Song of a Thousand Years68 and 69
Sound the Loud Timbrel 8 and 9
Speed Away 110 and 111
Spring, The (Round) 18
Stars and Stripes, The 21
Stars of the Summer Night 56
Star-Spangled Banner, The 67
Sweet and Low 58
Sword of Bunker Hill, The 112 and 113
   
Tara's Harp 14
There's Music in the Air 53
Those Evening Bells 61
To and Fro 89
To the Friends We Love 90
Three Blind Mice 114
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 46 and 47
Try, Try Again 5
Twinkle, Little Star 71
   
Uncle Ned 50
   
Vacant Chair, The 51
   
Wake, And Tune Your Youthful Voices 108
Wearing of the Green 26
We're All Noddin' 96
We're Tenting To-night 49
When Johnny Comes Marching Home 126
When the Swallows Homeward Fly 61
When You and I Were Young, Maggie 24 and 25
While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks 95
Whip-poor-will Song, The 19
Work, For the Night is Coming 76
Woodman, Spare That Tree 31
   
Yankee Doodle 52
Years of Peace 124

[Page 3: Music and Lyrics]

FOREWORD.

One of the primary purposes of the editor and compiler of this book was to make it possible for every one, especially the boys and girls of our schools, to become familiar with the favorite songs of our people. Not the popular song of the day but the songs that have stood the test of time; the songs of true sentiment, of school days, and early childhood, folk songs and national songs, also our patriotic songs and songs of peace and love.

Another purpose of this publication is to acquaint our citizens, young and old, with the history of our principal national and patriotic songs so that the meaning of the songs may be better understood.

In this connection it is suggested to teachers that these song stories be given, at appropriate times, as lessons, possibly at some singing period; also that it be required of the children that all of the verses of "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," and "The Star-Spangled Banner" be committed to memory.

In at least one of our states, no student can be graduated from grammar school until these songs are memorized, and it is suggested that beginning with the third or fourth grade up to and including the eighth a student should be able to pass a favorable examination on these two songs before being graduated to the next grade. In this way our future generations will not have such a lamentable lack of knowledge as the present generation has, of these, our two most notable national songs.

N. H. AITCH.

AMERICA.

America was written by Rev. Samuel F. Smith, a Baptist minister, who was born in Boston, October 21, 1808, and died November 16, 1895.

One of Dr. Smith's friends was Lowell Mason, the eminent musician. A friend had given Mr. Mason a lot of German music books. Being unable to read German the musician took the books to Dr. Smith and asked him to translate some of the songs for him.

Dr. Smith says: "Turning over the leaves of the book one gloomy day in February, 1832, I came across the air, "God Save the King." I liked the music. I glanced at the German words at the foot of the page. Under the inspiration of the moment I went to work and in half an hour "America" was the result. It was written on a scrap of paper I picked up from the table and the hymn of today is substantially as it was written that day."

The hymn was first sung at a children's Fourth of July celebration in Park Street Church, Boston. It did not have great popularity until the Civil War. Since then it has become the best known and most frequently sung of any of our national songs. The tune to which "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," is sung, is the same as that used for the national songs of England and Prussia. The origin of the music is uncertain. But one writer aptly says:

"There certainly must be something more than ordinarily inspiring in an air which has struck the popular heart of the three greatest nations of the earth."

AMERICA.

Samuel Francis Smith.                               Attributed to Henry Carey, 1748.

1.

My country! 'tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty,
Of thee I sing:
Land where my fathers died!
Land of the pilgrim's pride!
From ev'ry mountain side
Let freedom ring!

2.

My native country, thee,
Land of the noble, free,
Thy name I love;
I love thy rocks and rills,
Thy woods and templed hills:
My heart with rapture thrills
Like that above.

3.

Let music swell the breeze,
And ring from all the trees
Sweet freedom's song:
Let mortal tongues awake;
Let all that breathe partake;
Let rocks their silence break,
The sound prolong.

4.

Our father's God! to Thee,
Author of liberty,
To Thee we sing:
Long may our land be bright
With freedom's holy light;
Protect us by Thy might,
Great God, our King!

NEW VERSE.

  

God save our splendid men,
bring them safe home again,
God save our men.
Make the victorious,
patient and chivalrous;
they are so dear to us–
God save our men.


[Page 4: Music and Lyrics]

SAFELY THROUGH ANOTHER WEEK.

1.

Safely through another week, God has brought us on our way;
Let us now a blessing seek, Waiting in his courts to-day
Day of all the week the best, Emblem of eternal rest,
Day of all the week the best, Emblem of eternal rest.

2.

While we pray for pardoning grace, Thro' the dear Redeemer's name,
Show thy reconciled face, Take away our sin and shame;
From our worldly cares set free, May we rest this day in thee,
From our worldly cares set free, May we rest this day in thee.

3.

Here we come thy Name to praise; Let us feel thy presence near;
May thy glory meet our eyes. While we in thy house appear,
Here afford us, Lord, a taste Of our everlasting feast,
Here afford us, Lord, a taste Of our everlasting feast.

JOLLY OLD ST. NICHOLAS.

1.

Jolly old Saint Nicholas,
Lean your ear this way!
Don't you tell a single soul
What I'm going to say;
Christmas Eve is coming soon;
Now, you dear old man,
Whisper what you'll bring to me;
Tell me if you can.

2.

When the clock is striking twelve,
When I'm fast asleep,
Down the chimney broad and black,
With your pack you'll creep;
All the stockings you will find
Hanging in a row;
Mine will be the shortest one,
You'll be sure to know.

3.

Johnny wants a pair of skates;
Susy wants a dolly;
Nelly wants a story book;
She thinks dolls are folly;
As for me, my little brain
Isn't very bright;
Choose for me, Old Santa Claus,
What you think is right.


[Page 5: Music and Lyrics]

TRY, TRY AGAIN.

1.

'Tis a lesson you should heed,
Try, try again;
If at first you don't succeed,
Try, try again;
Then your courage shall appear,
For if you will persevere,
You will conquer, never fear.
Try, try again.

2.

Once or twice though you should fail,
Try, try again;
If at last you would prevail,
Try, try again;
If we strive 'tis no disgrace,
Though we may not win the race;
What should you do in that case?
Try, try again.

3.

If you find your task is hard,
Try, try again;
Time will bring you your reward,
Try, try again;
All that other folks can do,
Why, with patience, may not you?
Only keep this rule in view,
Try, try again.

A COMMENCEMENT HYMN.

1.

Great God, high over all,
On Thee we humbly call,
Guide of our youth;
Wisdom of seer and sage;
Source of each helpful page,
Light of each clime and age,
God of all Truth.

2.

Who seek true wisdom, find
God in the rushing wind
And in the flow'r;
Nations Thou dost control,
Giving to each its goal;
Thou mov'st in ev'ry soul,
God of all Pow'r.

3.

Once more Thy guiding hand
Brings us with joy to stand
In this glad place;
Now we the harvest bring;
To Thee our praises sing;
Loud let the welkin ring,
God of all Grace.

4.

To Thee, Our God and King,
Our work to-day we bring
And humbly pray;
May Truth and Pow'r and Grace,
Moulding each form and face,
Go forth to bless our race,
Now and for aye.


[Page 6: Music and Lyrics]

MOTION SONG–OUR FLAG.

A boy stands in front of the school holding a large flag which he waves at (2) in time to music.

1.

Flag 1 of our country brave, red, 2 white and blue,
We 2 love to watch thee wave, our 3 love is true.
Oh, let us loudly sing! loud let our praises ring,
Praise 1 to this noble thing, red, 2 white and blue.

2.

Red is 4 the blood that rolls, blue 5 is the sky,
White are 6 the heroes' souls, for 4 thee that die.
Oh, let us proudly sing! loud let our praises ring,
Praise 1 that this holy thing still waves 2 on high.

3.

Broad is 7 our native land, land of the free,
'Mong all the nations grand, foremost 1 to be.
Oh, let 8 us bow and sing thanks unto God, our King,
Thanks 9 for this holy thing, Father 10, to Thee!

(1) Right hand points at flag.

(2) Right hand waves three times over head.

(3) Both hands clasped.

(4) Look down and sing softly.

(5) Right hand points upward.

(6) Both hands crossed over breast.

(7) Both hands spread to utmost extent.

(8) Both hands clasped, head bowed.

(9) Both hands pointed toward flag.

(10) Both hands clasped, sing softly with face upward.

SOFTLY NOW THE LIGHT OF DAY.

1.

Softly now the light of day
Fades upon my sight away;
Free from care, from labor free,
Lord, I would commune with thee.

2.

Thou, whose all-pervading eye
Naught escapes, without, within,
Pardon each infirmity,
Open fault and secret sin.

3.

Soon for me the light of day
Shall for ever pass away;
Then, from sin and sorrow free,
Take me, Lord, to dwell with Thee.

4.

Thou who, sinless, yet hast known
All of man's infirmity;
Then, from Thine eternal throne,
Jesus, look with pitying eye.


[Page 7: Music and Lyrics]

IMITATION SONG.

1.

This 1 is the way we clap our hands,
We clap our hands, we clap our hands;
This is the way we clap our hands,
As merrily we play.

2.

This 2is the way we show our hands,
We show our hands, we show our hands;
This is the way we show our hands
In beautiful array.

3.

This 3 is the way the clock does tick,
The clock does tick, the clock does tick;
This is the way the clock does tick
And tells how time does fly.

4.

This 4 is the noise the guns do make,
The guns do make, the guns do make;
This is the noise the guns do make,
On a celebration day.

1. Left hand horizontally in front of the chest–palm upward–right hand raised and brought down on the left with a clap.

2. Hands raised. Turn the hands backward and forward.

3. Swing both hands and arms from right to left, and return (to imitate the swinging of the pendulum) and snap the fingers (to imitate the ticking of the clock)

4. Take aim. After the last word is sung, pause a second, then give the report, which is done by setting the left foot forward and the word BOOM given, and the power of M prolonged, gradually diminishing until the sound ceases, as the report of a gun gradually dies away in the distance.

HAND-EXERCISE SONG.

Packard.

1.

1 Roll your hands, roll your hands, As slowly, as slowly, as slow can be;
2 Then fold your arms like me, like me, Then fold your arms like me.

2.

3 Roll your hands, roll your hands, As swiftly, as swiftly, as swift can be;
2 Then fold your arms like me, like me, Then fold your arms like me.

3.

4 Clap your hands, clap your hands, As softly, as softly, as soft can be;
2 Then fold your arms like me, like me, Then fold your arms like me.

4.

5 Clap your hands, clap your hands, As loudly, as loudly, as loud can be;
2 Then fold your arms like me, like me, Then fold your arms like me.

MOTIONS.–(1) Revolve the hands slowly round each other, in front of, and from the chest.

(2) Hands folded in front of them.

(3) Revolve the hands swiftly round each other, in front of, and from the chest.

(4) Left hand horizontally in front of the chest–palm upward–right hand raised, and brought down upon the left without a sound.

(5) Left hand horizontally in front of the chest–palm upward–right hand raised, and brought down upon the left with a loud clap.


[Page 8: Music and Lyrics]

SOUND THE LOUD TIMBREL.

CHARLES AVISON.

1.

Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea;
Jehovah has triumphed, His people are free;
Sing, for the pride of the tyrant is broken;
His chariots, His horsemen all splendid and brave;
How vain was their boasting, the Lord hath but spoken,
And chariots and horsemen are sunk in the wave.

Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea;
Jehovah has triumphed, His people are free,
Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea;
Jehovah has triumphed, His people are free,
His people are free, His people are free.

2.

Praise to the conqueror, Praise to the Lord:
His word was our arrow, His breath was our sword.
Who shall return to tell Egypt the story
Of those she sent forth in the hour of her pride?
The Lord hath look'd out from His pillar of glory,
And all her brave thousands are dash'd in the tide.

Praise to the Conqueror, Praise to the Lord:
His word was our arrow, His breath was our sword.
Praise to the Conqueror, Praise to the Lord:
His word was our arrow, His breath was our sword.
His breath was our sword, His breath was our sword.


[Page 9: Music and Lyrics]

SOUND THE LOUD TIMBREL.–Con.


[Page 10: Music and Lyrics]

HALLELUJAH CHORUS.

G. F. HANDEL.

Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!

For the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth.
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
For the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth.
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!

The kingdom of this world
is become the kingdom of our Lord,
and of his Christ, and of his Christ;
and he shall reign for ever and ever,
King of kings, (forever and ever.)
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! (and Lord of Lords.)
forever and ever,
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
King of kings, and Lord of lords,
and he shall reign for ever and ever,
and he shall reign forever and ever, (and he shall reign forever and ever,)
King of kings, (for ever and ever,)
and Lord of lords! (Hallelujah! Hallelujah!)
and he shall reign forever, for ever and ever,
King of kings, and Lord of lords!
King of kings, and Lord of lords!
and he shall reign forever and ever,
forever, and ever, forever, and ever, (King of kings, and Lord of lords!)
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Hallelujah!


[Page 11: Music and Lyrics]

HALLELUJAH CHORUS.–Con.


[Page 12: Music and Lyrics]

ANVIL CHORUS.

VERDI.

God of the nations, in glory enthroned,
Upon our lov'd country Thy blessing pour;
Guide us and guard us from strife in the future,
Let Peace dwell among us for evermore!

Proudly our banner now gleams with golden lustre!
Brighter each star shines in the glorious cluster!
Liberty forevermore! And Peace and Union,
And Peace and Union throughout our happy land.


[Page 13: Music and Lyrics]

ANVIL CHORUS.–Con.


[Page 14: Music and Lyrics]

JESUS, LOVER OF MY SOUL.

Charles Wesley                               S. B. March

1.

Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly,
While the nearer waters roll,
While the tempest still is high;
Hide me, O my Savior, hide,
Till the storm of life is past;
Safe into the haven guide;
Oh, receive my soul at last.

2.

Other refuge have I none,
Hangs my helpless soul on Thee;
Leave, oh! leave me not alone,
Still support and comfort me.
All my trust on Thee is stayed,
All my help from Thee I bring;
Cover my defenseless head
With the shadow of Thy wing.

3.

Thou, O Christ, art all I want,
More than all in Thee I find;
Raise the fallen, cheer the faint,
Heal the sick, and lead the blind.
Just and holy is Thy Name,
I am all unrighteousness;
Vile and full of sin I am;
Thou art full of truth and grace.

TARA'S HARP.

1.

The harp that once thro' Tara's halls
The soul of music shed;
Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls
As tho' that soul were fled.
So sleeps the pride of former days,
So glory's thrill is o'er,
And hearts that once beat high for praise
Now feel that pulse no more.

2.

No more to chiefs and ladies bright
The harp of Tara swells;
The chord alone that breaks at night
Its tale of ruin tells.
Thus Freedom now so seldom wakes,
The only throb she gives
Is when some heart, indignant, breaks,
To show that still she lives.


[Page 15: Music and Lyrics]

Keller's American Hymn.

M. KELLER.

1.

Speed our Republic, O Father on high,
Lead us in pathways of justice and right;
Rulers as well as the ruled, one and all,
Girdle with virtue, the armor of might!
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!
Rulers as well as the ruled, one and all,
Girdle with virtue, the armor of might!
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!

2.

Foremost in battle, for Freedom to stand,
We rush to arms when aroused by its call;
Still as of yore when George Washington led,
Thunders our war-cry, "We conquer or fall!"
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!
Still as of yore when George Washington led,
Thunders our war-cry, "We conquer or fall!"
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!

3.

Rise up, proud eagle, rise up to the clouds,
Spread thy broad wing o'er this fair western world!
Fling from thy beak our dear banner of old!
Show that it still is for freedom unfurled!
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!
Fling from thy beak our dear banner of old!
Show that it still is for freedom unfurled!
Hail! three times hail to our country and flag!

NOW THE DAY IS OVER.

S. BARING-GOULD                               J. BARNEY

1.

Now the day is over,
Night is drawing nigh,
Shadows of the evening
Steal across the sky.

2.

Jesus, give the weary
Calm and sweet repose,
With Thy tend'rest blessing,
May our eyelids close.

3.

When the morning wakens,
Then may we arise
Pure and fresh and sinless
In Thy holy eyes.


[Page 16: Music and Lyrics]

HARROW MARCHES ONWARD.

1.

Harrow marches onward Up the hills of hope,
Faces all to sunward, Feet against the slope;
What the goal or end is, Time has yet to guess;
But where'er a friend is Trust a friend to press!
Panting on and up, in the teeming early dew,
Bearing all the old, while they mount toward the new.

Harrow marches onward,
New worlds to find;
Harrow marches onward,
Who will lag behind?

2.

Great the might of number, Weak the work of one;
One may fall and slumber; Toils the army on.
Well it knows the tune it Marches with to fame;
Unit after unit, We can sing the same!
Higher up the height, where the loyal feet have led,
Chime voices in with the echo of their tread.


[Page 17: Music and Lyrics]

HARROW MARCHES ONWARD.–Con.

MILLER OF THE DEE.

CHAS. MACKAY.

1.

There dwelt a miller, hale and bold,
Beside the river Dee;
He wrought and sang from morn till night,
No lark more blithe than he;
And this the burden of his song
For ever used to be,
"I envy no one–no, not I!
And no one envies me!"

2.

"Thou'rt wrong, my friend!" said old King Hal,
"As wrong as wrong can be;
For could my heart be light as thine,
I'd gladly change with thee.
And tell me now what makes thee sing
With voice so loud and free
While I am sad, though I'm the King,
Beside the river Dee?"

3.

The miller smiled and doffed his cap;
"I earn my bread," quoth he;
"I love my wife, I love my friend,
I love my children three.
I owe no one I cannot pay,
I thank the river Dee,
That turns the mill that grinds the corn,
To feed my babes and me!"

4.

"Good friend," said Hal, and sighed the while,
"Farewell! and happy be;
But say no more, if thou'dst be true,
That no one envies thee;
Thy mealy cap is worth my crown;
Thy mill my kingdom's fee!
Such men as thou are England's boast,
Oh, miller of the Dee."


[Page 18: Music and Lyrics]

I CANNOT SING THE OLD SONGS.

1.

I cannot sing the old songs, I sang long years ago,
For heart and voice would fail me, And foolish tears would flow;
For bygone hours come o'er my heart, with each familiar strain.
I cannot sing the old songs, Or dream those dreams again,
I cannot sing the old songs, Or dream those dreams again.

2.

I cannot sing the old songs, Their charm is sad and deep;
Their melodies would waken Old sorrows from their sleep,
And tho' all unforgotten still, and sadly sweet they be,
I cannot sing the old songs, They are too dear to me;
I cannot sing the old songs, They are too dear to me.

3.

I cannot sing the old songs, For visions come again
Of golden dreams departed And years of weary pain,
Perhaps when earthly fetters shall have set my spirit free,
My voice may know the old songs, For all eternity.
My voice may know the old songs, For all eternity.

The Spring

ROUND

DR. HAYES

The Spring is come, I hear the birds that sing from bush to bush
Hark! hark! I hear them sing.
The linnet and the little wren, the blackbird and the thrush.


[Page 19: Music and Lyrics]

THE MINSTREL BOY.

1.

The minstrel boy to the war is gone,
In the ranks of death you'll find him;
His father's sword he hath girded on,
And his wild harp slung behind him.
"Land of song!" said the warrior bard,
"Tho' all the world betrays thee,
One sword at least thy right shall guard,
One faithful harp shall praise thee."

2.

The minstrel fell, but the foeman's chain
Could not bring that proud soul under;
The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again,
For he tore its chords asunder,
And said "No chain shall sully thee,
Thou soul of love and bravery!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free,
They shall never sound in slavery."

THE WHIPPOORWILL SONG.

1.

I love to stray by the woody rill, Where ev'ning shadows play,
And hear the song of the whippoorwill, as he sings his ev'ning lay

Soprano Solo:
Whippoorwill, whippoorwill, Whippoorwill, whippoorwill, whippoorwill,
Whippoorwill, whippoorwill, Whippoorwill, whippoorwill, whippoorwill.

CHORUS.
O, list, O, list, as he sings his ev'ning song, sweet song,
O, list, O, list, as he sings his ev'ning song, sweet song.

2.

O soft he trills his ev'ning song, By breezes borne along,
A sudden feeling o'er me creeps, As I listen to his song

3.

It calls to mind the old, old home, so many miles away,
With long-lost friends I have oft-times heard Him sing his ev'ning lay.



[Page 20: Music and Lyrics]

MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB.

1.

Mary had a little lamb, little lamb, little lamb,
Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow;
And ev'rywhere that Mary went, Mary went, Mary went,
Ev'rywhere that Mary went, The lamb was sure to go.

2.

It followed her to school one day, school one day, school one day,
It followed her to school one day, It was against the rule.
It made the children laugh and play, laugh and play, laugh and play,
It made the children laugh and play, To see the lamb in school.

Bleating of the lamb, Ba-a-a-ah, Ba-a-a-ah,

O! ain't I glad to get out the wilderness, get out the wilderness, get out the wilderness,
Aint I glad to get out the wilderness, Leaning on the lamb.


[Page 21: Music and Lyrics]

MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB.–Con.

THE STARS AND STRIPES.

AIT.

1.

O Star-spangled banner! O red, white, and blue!
The hearts of all freemen turn fondly to you;
And strong arms are ready to strike with a will
Till foes of our freedom are humbled and still.

2.

Invincible banner! the flag of the free!
O where treads the foot that would falter for thee?
Give tears for the parting–a murmur of pray'r–
Then, forward! The fame of our standard to share.

3.

O God of our fathers! this banner must shine
Where battle is hottest, in warfare divine.
O lead us, till wide from the Gulf to the sea,
The land shall be sacred to freedom and Thee.


[Page 22: Music and Lyrics]

LAST NIGHT THE NIGHTINGALE WOKE ME.

1.

Last night the nightingale woke me, Last night when all was still;
It sang in the golden moonlight, From out the woodland hill.
I opened my window so gently, I looked on the dreaming dew
And oh, the bird, my darling, Was singing, singing of you, of you.

2.

I think of you in the daytime, I dream of you by night;
I wake, and would you were here, love, And tears are blinding my sight.
I hear a low breath in the lime-tree, The wind is floating thro'
And oh, the night, my darling, Is sighing, sighing for you, for you.

3.

Oh think not I can forget you; I could not tho' I would;
I see you in all around me. The stream, the night, the wood.
The flowers that slumber so gently, the stars above the blue.
Oh heav'n itself, my darling, Is praying, praying for you, for you.

MERRILY, MERRILY

(ROUND)

1 Merrily, merrily, greet the morn:
2 Cheerily, cheerily sound the horn.
3 Hark! to the echoes, hear them play
4 O'er hill and dale, far, far away.


[Page 23: Music and Lyrics]

MY OWN NATIVE LAND.

WM. B. BRADBURY.

1.

I have roamed over mountain, I've crossed over flood,
I've traversed the wave-rolling strand;
Tho' the fields were as green, and the moon shone as bright,
Yet it was not my own native land.
No, no, no, no, no, no. No, no, no, no, no, no.

2.

The right hand of friendship how oft have I grasped,
And bright eyes have smiled and looked bland;
Yet happier far were the hours that I passed
In the West, in my own native land.
Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

3.

Then hail, dear Columbia, the land that we love,
Where flourishes Liberty's tree;
'Tis the birth place of freedom, our own native home;
'Tis the land, 'tis the land of the free.
Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

LITTLE DROPS OF WATER.

KINDERGARTEN.

1.

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty Ocean
And the beauteous land,
And the beauteous land.

2.

And the little moments,
Humble though they be,
Make the mighty ages
Of eternity,
Of eternity.

3.

So our little errors,
Lead the soul away
From the paths of virtue,
Oft sin to stray.

4.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden
Like the Heaven above.

5.

Little seeds of mercy,
Sown by youthful hands,
Grow to bless the nations
Far in heathen lands.


[Page 24: Music and Lyrics]

WHEN YOU AND I WERE YOUNG, MAGGIE.

1.

I wandered to-day to the hill, Maggie,
To watch the scene below;
The creek and the creaking old mill, Maggie,
As we used to long ago:
The green grove is gone from the hill, Maggie,
Where first the daisies sprung;
The creaking old mill is still, Maggie,
Since you and I were young.

2.

A city so silent and lone, Maggie,
Where the young and the gay and the best,
In polished white mansion of stone, Maggie,
Have each found a place of rest,
Is built where the birds used to play, Maggie,
And join in the songs that were sung
For we sang as gay as they, Maggie,
When you and I were young.

3.

They say I am feeble with age, Maggie,
My steps are less sprightly than then,
My face is a well written page, Maggie,
But time alone was the pen.
They say we are aged and gray, Maggie,
As sprays by the white breakers flung;
But to me you're as fair as you were, Maggie,
When you and I were young.


[Page 25: Music and Lyrics]

WHEN YOU AND I WERE YOUNG, MAGGIE.–Con.

HO, HO, VACATION DAYS ARE HERE.

J. C. JOHNSON.

1.

Ho, ho, vacation days are here, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
We welcome them with right good cheer, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
In wisdom's halls we love to be, But yet 'tis pleasant to be free,
Ho, ho, vacation days are here, Tra la, tra la, tra la!

2.

Ho, ho, the hill, the wood, the dale, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
The lake on which we used to sail, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
We greet thee all with right good cheer, In thought unchanged again we're here,
Ho, ho, the hill, the wood, the dale, Tra la, tra la, tra la!

3.

Ho, ho, ye songsters of the shade, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
A merry troop your haunts invade, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
Beware, our songs of merry glee, Shall fright ye from the greenwood tree,
Ho, ho, ye songsters of the shade, Tra la, tra la, tra la!

4.

Ho, ho, the hours will quickly fly, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
And soon vacation time be by, Tra la, tra la, tra la!
Ah, then we'll all, in glad refrain, Sing welcome to our school again,
Ho, ho, the hours will quickly fly, Tra la, tra la, tra la!


[Page 26: Music and Lyrics]

THE WEARING OF THE GREEN.

1.

Oh! Paddy, dear, and did you hear the news that's going round?
The shamrock is forbid by law to grow on Irish ground;
Saint Patrick's Day no more we'll keep, His color can't be seen,
For there's a bloody law agin' the Wearin' o' the Green;
I met with Napper Tandy and he tuk me by the hand,
And he said, "How's poor ould Ireland, and how does she stand?"
She's the most distressful country, that ever you have seen,
They're hanging men and women there for wearing of the green.

2.

Then since the color we must wear, is England's cruel red,
Sure Ireland's sons will ne'er forget, the blood that they have shed;
You may take the shamrock from your hat and cast it on the sod,
But 'twill take root and flourish still, tho' underfoot 'tis trod;
When the law can stop the blades of grass from growing as they grow,
And when the leaves in summer time their verdure dare not show;
Then I will change the color I wear in my caubeen,
But 'till that day, I'll stick for aye to wearing of the green.

3.

But if at last our color should be torn from Ireland's heart,
Our sons with shame and sorrow from the dear old soil will part;
I've heard whisper of a country that lies far beyant the say,
Where rich and poor stand equal, in the light of freedom's day;
Oh, Erin must we leave you, driven by the tyrant's hand,
Must we ask a mother's welcome from a strange but happy land?
Where the cruel cross of England's thraldom never shall be seen,
And where, in peace, we'll live and die, a-wearing of the green.


[Page 27: Music and Lyrics]

SAILING.

GODFREY MARKS.

1.

Y'heave ho! my lads, the wind blows free,
A pleasant gale is on our lee;
And soon across the ocean clear,
Our gallant barque shall bravely steer.
But ere we part from England's shores to-night,
A song we'll sing for home and beauty bright.

CHORUS.
Then here's to the sailor, and here's to the hearts so true,
Who will think of him upon the waters blue!
Sailing, sailing, over the bounding main;
For many a stormy wind shall blow, ere Jack comes home again!
Sailing, sailing, over the bounding main;
For many a stormy wind shall blow, ere Jack comes home again!

2.

The sailor's life is bold and free,
His home is on the rolling sea;
And never heart more true or brave
Than his who launches on the wave,
Afar he speeds in distant climes to roam,
With jocund song he rides the sparkling foam.

3.

The tide is flowing with the gale,
Y'Heave ho! my lads, set ev'ry sail;
The harbor bar we soon shall clear;
Farewell once more to home so dear,
For when the tempest rages loud and long,
That home shall be our guiding star and song.


[Page 28: Music and Lyrics]

HAIL TO THE CHIEF.

SIR WALTER SCOTT.                               SANDERSON.

1.

|: Hail to the chief, who in triumph advances,
Honor'd and bless'd be the evergreen pine!
Long may the tree in his banner that glances,
Flourish, the shelter and grace of our line. :|

Heav'n send it happy dew, Earth lend it sap anew;
Gaily to burgeon, and broadly to grow;
While ev'ry highland glen Sends our shout back again,
"Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho! ieroe!"

2.

|: Ours is no sapling, chance-sown by the fountain,
Blooming at Beltane, in winter to fade;
When the whirlwind has stripp'd ev'ry leaf on the mountain,
The more shall Clan Alpine exult in her shade. :|

Moor'd in the rifted rock, Proof to the tempest shock,
Firmer he roots him, the ruder it blow;
Menteith and Breadalbane, then, Echo his praise again,
"Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho! ieroe!"

3.

|: Row vassals, row for the pride of the Highlands!
Stretch to your oars, for the evergreen pine!
Oh, that the rosebud that graces yon islands,
Were wreath'd in a garland around him to twine! :|

O that some seedling gem, Worthy such noble stem,
Honor'd and bless'd in their shadow might grow!
Loud should Clan Alpine then, Ring from her deepmost glen,
"Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho! ieroe!"


[Page 29: Music and Lyrics]

MICHIGAN, MY MICHIGAN.

MRS. JANE W. BRENT.

1.

Home of my heart, I sing of thee,
Michigan, My Michigan,
Thy lake-bound shores I long to see,
Michigan, my Michigan.
From Saginaw's tall whisp'ring pines,
To Lake Superior's farthest mines,
Fair in the light of memory shines
Michigan, my Michigan.

2.

Thou gav'st thy sons without a sigh,
Michigan, my Michigan,
And sent thy bravest forth to die,
Michigan, my Michigan.
Beneath a hostile southern sky
They bore thy banner proud and high,
Ready to fight, but never fly,
Michigan, my Michigan.

3.

From Yorktown on to Richmond's wall,
Michigan, my Michigan,
They bravely fight, as bravely fall,
Michigan, my Michigan.
To Williamsburg we point with pride–
Our Fifth and Second, side by side,
There stemmed and stayed the battle's tide,
Michigan, my Michigan.

4.

When worn with watching traitor foes,
Michigan, my Michigan,
The welcome night brought sweet repose,
Michigan, my Michigan.
The soldier, weary from the fight,
Sleeps sound, nor fears the rebels' might,
For "Michigan's on guard to-night!"
Michigan, my Michigan.


[Page 30: Music and Lyrics]

LITTLE BOY BLUE.

J. E. SMITH.
EUGENE FIELD.

1.

The little toy dog is covered with dust,
But sturdy and staunch he stands;
And the little toy soldier is red with rust,
And his musket it moulds in his hands.
Time was when the little toy dog was new,
And the soldier was passing fair,
And there was the time when our Little Boy Blue
Kissed them and put them there.

2.

"Now, don't you go till I come," he said,
"And don't you make any noise!"
So, toddling off to his trundle bed,
He dreamed of the pretty toys;
And as he was dreaming an angel song
Awakened our Little Boy Blue–
Oh! the years are many, the years are long,
But the little toy friends are true.

3.

Ah, faithful to Little Boy Blue they stand,
Each in the same old place–
Awaiting the touch of a little hand,
The smile of a little face;
And they wonder, as waiting the long years thro'
In the dust of that little chair,
What has become of our Little Boy Blue,
Since he kissed them and put them there.

GLAD CHRISTMAS BELLS.

CHRISTMAS HYMN.

1.

Glad Christmas bells, your music tells
The sweet and pleasant story;
How came to earth, in lowly birth,
The Lord of life and glory.

2.

No palace hall its ceiling tall
His kingly head spread over,
There only stood a stable rude
The heavenly Babe to cover.

3.

Nor raiment gay, as there He lay,
Adorn'd the infant stranger;
Poor, humble child of mother mild,
She laid Him in a manger.

4.

But from afar, a splendid star
The wise men westward turning;
The livelong night saw pure and bright,
Above His birthplace burning.

5.

Where on the hill, all safe and still,
The folded flocks were lying,
Down through the air an angel fair
On wing of flame came flying.

6.

"Fear not," said he,–for tremblingly
The shepherds stood in wonder,–
"Glad news I bring, the promised King
Lies in a stable yonder.

7.

"And by this sign, the babe divine
You may discover surely,
A manger His rude dwelling is,
There lies He, cradled poorly."

8.

Then swiftly came, in lines of flame,
Like countless meteors blazing,
A multitude, and with Him stood,
A spectacle amazine.

9.

And all the choir, with tongues of fire,
Broke forth in joyful singing,
Till with their cry, the very sky
From end to end was ringing.

10.

"Glory to Thee for ever be,
God in the highest, glory!
Good will to men, and peace again
O earth, is beaming o'er thee!"


[Page 31: Music and Lyrics]

GLAD CHRISTMAS BELLS.–Con.

WOODMAN, SPARE THAT TREE.

HENRY RUSSELL.
GEORGE P. MORRIS.

1.

Woodman, spare that tree!
Touch not a single bough;
In youth it sheltered me,
And I'll protect it now;
'Twas my forefather's hand,
That placed it near his cot,
There, woodman, let it stand,
Thy axe shall harm it not!

2.

That old familiar tree,
Its glory and renown
Are spread o'er land and sea,
And would'st thou hew it down?
Woodman, forbear thy stroke!
Cut not its earth-bound ties;
Oh, spare that aged oak,
Now tow'ring to the skies.

3.

When but an idle boy,
I sought its grateful shade;
In all their gushing joy,
Here, too, my sisters played;
My mother kissed me here;
My father pressed my hand,
Forgive this foolish tear,
But let that old oak stand!

4.

My heart-strings round thee cling,
Close as thy bark, old friend!
Here shall the wild-bird sing,
And still thy branches bend.
Old tree, the storm thou'lt brave,
And, woodman, leave the spot;
While I've a hand to save,
Thy axe shall harm it not!


[Page 32: Music and Lyrics]

THE RAINY DAY.

1.

The rain 1 is falling very fast,
We can't go out to play:
But we are happy while in school,
Tho' 'tis a rainy day.

Then clap, 2 clap, 2 clap 2 together 2 2 2 Clap, 2 clap, 2 away,
The school 3 may be a happy place upon a rainy day.

2.

For while the rain comes pat'ring down,
We merrily sing our song,
To hearts content and spirits light,
Time quickly speeds along.

Then clap, etc.

3.

We listen all attentively
To what our teachers say,
But 4 when our lessons all are o'er,
'Tis then the time to play.

Then clap, etc.

4.

With smiling 5 faces at our posts,
So 6 orderly we stand,
Then 7 quickly turn and now sit 8 down,
When teacher gives command.

Then clap, etc.

1. Strike the ends of the fingers irregularly on the desk (to imitate the rain pattering on the roof of a building.)

2. Left hand horizontally in front of the chest–palm upward–right hand raised and brought down on the left with a clap.

3. Hands dropped at sides.

4. Form an open book with the hands, holding them in front of chest– palm upward, little fingers touching each other–eyes directed to the book with a very studious look.

5. Smile.

6. Feet in position, body erect, head set, hands folded or by the side.

7. Turn to the right, one-half way around.

8. Sit down without moving the feet–body erect, head set, hands folded or by the side.

THE BEES.

The bees are flying and humming, Why are they all coming?
Honey they do seek, honey they do seek.
Bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz. Bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz, bz.
Take care, beware, the drone is there, Take care, beware, the drone is there.

One child is placed alone in a distant part of the room or playground, to represent the drone, the others represent the bees, and stand on the opposite side, singing their song. At "take care," the drone tries to catch one of them; they all avoid him as long as possible. When one is caught, he becomes the drone.

THE DONKEY.–Four Part Round.

1. Sweetly sings the donkey, On his way to hay,
2. If you don't go with him, He will run away,
3. Ka-hi, ka-ho, ka-haa, Ka-hi, ka-ho, ka-haa,
4. Ka-hi, ka-ho, ka-haa, Ka-hi, ka-ho, ka-haa.


[Page 33: Music and Lyrics]

THE LORELEY.

Friedrich Silcher.

1.

I know not what it presages,
That I am so sad to-day;
A legend of former ages
Will not from my tho'ts away.
The air is cool and it darkles,
The Rhine flows calmly on,
The peak of the mountain sparkles
In the glow of the evening sun.

2.

The most beautiful maid is reclining
On the cliff, so wondrous fair,
Her glorious jewels are shining,
She is combing her golden hair;
With a golden comb she combs it,
And sings a song thereby,
That thrills with its mystic meaning,
And powerful melody.

3.

It siezes with wildest yearning,
The boatman, entranced in his skiff;
He sees not the treacherous breakers,
He gazes alone on the cliff.
And soon will the waves engulf them,
Both boat and boatman strong.
For thus in her toils hath she bound them,
The Loreley with her song.


[Page 34: Music and Lyrics]

GO TO SLEEP, LENA DARLING. (Emmet's Lullaby.)

1.

Close your eyes, Lena, my darling,
While I sing your lullaby, Fear thou no danger, Lena,
Move not, dear Lena, my darling,
For your brooder watches nigh you, Lena dear.
Angels guide thee, Lena dear, my darling,
Nothing evil can come near;
Brightest flowers blow for thee,
Darling sister, dear to me.

CHORUS.
Go to sleep, go to sleep, my baby, my baby, my baby,
Go to sleep, my baby, baby, oh, by,
Go to sleep, Lena, sleep.

2.

Bright be de morning, my darling,
Ven you ope your eyes, Sunbeams glow all 'round you, Lena.
Peace be with thee, love, my darling,
Blue and cloudless be the sky for Lena dear.
Birds sing their bright songs for thee, my darling,
Full of sweetest melody,
Angels ever hover near,
Darling sister, dear to me.


[Page 35: Music and Lyrics]

Loch Lomond.

Old Scotch Song.

1.

By yon bonnie banks, And by yon bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond,
Where me and my true love Were ever wont to gae,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

CHORUS.
Oh! ye'll take the high road, and I'll take the low road,
And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,
But me and my true love we'll never meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

2.

'Twas then that we parted In yon shady glen,
On the steep, steep side of Ben Lomond,
Where in purple hue The Highland hills we view,
And the moon coming out in the gloaming.

3.

The wee birdie sang, And the wild flowers spring,
And in sunshine the waters are sleeping,
But the broken heart it kens Nae second spring again,
Tho' the waeful may cease frae their greeting.

Some dear friend of yours would like to have a copy of this book. Why not send him one? Though it will be an inexpensive gift it will carry lots of happiness and sunshine with it. See title page for price.


[Page 36: Music and Lyrics]

LILLY DALE.

1.

'Twas a calm, still night, and the moon's pale light
Shone soft o'er hill and vale;
When friends, mute with grief, stood around the death bed
Of my poor lost Lilly Dale.

CHORUS.
O Lilly, sweet Lilly, dear Lilly Dale,
Now the wild rose blossoms o'er her little green grave,
'Neath the trees in the flow'ry vale.

2.

Her cheeks that once glowed, with the rose-tint of health,
By the hand of disease hath turned pale,
And the death damp was on the pure white brow
Of my poor lost Lilly Dale.

3.

"I go," she said, "to the land of rest,
And ere my strength shall fail,
I must tell you where, near my own loved home,
You must lay poor Lilly Dale."

4.

"'Neath the chestnut tree, where the wild flowers grow,
And the stream ripples forth thro' the vale,
Where the birds shall warble their songs in spring,
There lay poor Lilly Dale."

COME, WITH THY LUTE.

1.

Come, with thy lute, to the fountain;
Sing me a song of the mountain;
Sing of the happy and free;
There, while the ray is declining,
While its last roses are shining,
Sweet shall our melodies be,
Under the broad linden tree,
Under the broad linden tree.

2.

Come, where the zephyrs are straying,
Where, mid the flower-buds playing,
Rambles the blithe summer bee;
Let the lone churl, in his sorrow,
He who despairs of the morrow,
Far to his solitude flee,
Under the dark cypress tree,
Under the dark cypress tree.

3.

Why should we droop in our sadness?
Nature, her promise of gladness
Sheds over land and o'er sea;
Come, bring thy lute to the fountain,
Sing, love, a song of the mountain;
Sweet shall our melodies be,
Under the broad linden tree,
Under the broad linden tree.


[Page 37: Music and Lyrics]

COME WITH THY LUTE.–Con.

JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE, MOTHER.

Geo. F. Root.

1.

Just before the battle, Mother,
I am thinking most of you,
While upon the field we're watching,
With the enemy in view.
Comrades brave are round me lying,
Filled with tho'ts of home and God;
For well they know that on the morrow
Some will sleep beneath the sod.

CHORUS.
Farewell, Mother, you may never, you may never, Mother,
Press me to your breast again,
But, oh, you'll not forget me, Mother, (you will not forget me)
If I'm numbered with the slain.

2.

Hark! I hear the bugles sounding,
'Tis the signal for the fight;
Now, may God protect us, Mother,
As He ever does the right.
Hear the "Battle-Cry of Freedom,"
How it swells upon the air;
Oh, yes, we'll rally round the standard,
Or we'll perish nobly there.


[Page 38: Music and Lyrics]

THE DEAREST SPOT.

W. T. A.                               W. T. Wrighton.

1.

The dearest spot on earth to me Is home, sweet home;
The fairy land I've longed to see Is home, sweet home;
There how charmed the sense of hearing,
There where hearts are so endearing;
All the world is not so cheering As home, sweet home.

D. C.
The dearest spot on earth to me Is home, sweet home.
The fairy land I've longed to see Is home, sweet home.

2.

I've taught my heart the way to prize My home, sweet home;
I've learned to look with lover's eyes On home, sweet home;
There where vows are truly plighted,
There where hearts are so united;
All the world besides I've slighted For home, sweet home.

JUANITA.
(WAH-NEE-TA)

Mrs. Norton                               Spanish Melody.

1.

Soft o'er the fountain,
Ling'ring falls the southern moon;
Far o'er the mountain,
Breaks the day too soon!
In thy dark eyes' splendor,
Where the warm light loves to dwell,
Weary looks yet tender,
Speak their fond farewell.

Nita! Juanita!
Ask thy soul if we should part!
Nita! Juanita!
Lean thou on my heart.

2.

When in thy dreaming,
Moons like these shall shine again,
And daylight beaming,
Prove thy dreams are vain,
Wilt thou not, relenting,
For thine absent lover sigh?
In thy heart consenting
To a prayer gone by?

Nita! Juanita!
Let me linger by thy side!
Nita! Juanita!
Be my own fair bride!


[Page 39: Music and Lyrics]

JUANITA.–Con.

ROCKED IN THE CRADLE OF THE DEEP.

1.

Rocked in the cradle of the deep,
I lay me down in peace to sleep;
Secure I rest upon the wave,
For Thou, O Lord, hast power to save.
I know Thou wilt not slight my call,
For Thou dost mark the sparrow's fall;

And calm and peaceful is my sleep,
Rocked in the cradle of the deep;
And calm and peaceful is my sleep,
Rocked in the cradle of the deep.

2.

And such the trust that still were mine,
Tho' stormy winds sweep o'er the brine,
Or though the tempest's fiery breath
Rouse me from sleep to wreck and death,–
In ocean cave, still safe with Thee,
The germ of immortality;

And calm and peaceful is my sleep,
Rocked in the cradle of the deep;
And calm and peaceful is my sleep,
Rocked in the cradle of the deep.


[Page 40: Music and Lyrics]

LONG, LONG AGO.

T. H. Bayly.

1.

Tell me the tales that to me were so dear,
Long, long ago, Long, long ago;
Sing me the songs I delighted to hear,
Long, long ago, long ago.
Now you are come, all my grief is removed,
Let me forget that so long you have roved,
Let me believe that you love as you loved,
Long, long ago, long ago.

2.

Do you remember the path where we met,
Long, long ago, Long, long ago?
Ah, yes, you told me you ne'er would forget,
Long, long ago, long ago.
Then, to all others, my smile you preferred,
Love, when you spoke, gave a charm to each word,
Still my heart treasures the praises I heard,
Long, long ago, long ago.

3.

Tho' by your kindness my fond hopes were raised,
Long, long ago, Long, long ago,
You by more eloquent lips have been praised,
Long, long ago, long, long ago,
But by long absence your truth has been tried,
Still to your accents I listen with pride,
Blest as I was when I sat by your side,
Long, long ago, long ago.

ROBIN ADAIR.

1.

What's this dull town to me? Robin's not near;
What was't I wished to see, What wished to hear?
Where's all the joy and mirth
That made this town a heav'n on earth?
Oh! they're all fled with thee, Robin Adair.

2.

What made th' assembly shine? Robin Adair;
What made the ball so fine? Robin was there;
What when the play was o'er,
What made my heart so sore?
Oh! it was parting with Robin Adair.

3.

But now thou'rt cold to me, Robin Adair;
But now thou'rt cold to me, Robin Adair;
Yet him I loved so well,
Still in my heart shall dwell,
Oh! I can ne'er forget Robin Adair.


[Page 41: Music and Lyrics]

LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG.

Clifton Bingham.                               J. L. Molloy.

1.

Once in the dear dead days beyond recall,
When on the world the mists began to fall,
Out of the dreams that rose in happy throng,
Low to our hearts love sang an old sweet song;
And in the dusk, where fell the firelight gleam,
Softly it wove itself into our dream.

REFRAIN:
Just a song at twilight, when the lights are low,
And the flick'ring shadows softly come and go;
Tho' the heart be weary, sad the day and long,
Still to us at twilight comes love's old song,
Comes love's old sweet song.

2.

Even to-day we hear love's song of yore,
Deep in our hearts it dwells forevermore.
Footsteps may falter, weary grow the way,
Still we can hear it at the close of day;
So till the end, when life's dim shadows fall,
Love will be found the sweetest song of all.

Because "Just a Song at Twilight" brings joy to the weary soul, wouldn't it be wise of you to send a copy of this bookful of inspiration and happiness to that friend who needs a little reminder from you? It will cost you but a few cents but will mean much to the friend.


[Page 42: Music and Lyrics]

HAIL, COLUMBIA!

1.

Hail, Columbia, happy land!
Hail, ye heroes! heav'n-born band!
Who fought and bled in Freedom's cause,
Who fought and bled in Freedom's cause,
And when the storm of war was gone,
Enjoyed the peace your valor won.
Let independence be our boast,
Ever mindful what it cost;
Ever grateful for the prize,
Let its altar reach the skies.

CHORUS.
Firm, united, let us be,
Rallying round our liberty;
As a band of brothers joined,
Peace and safety we shall find.

2.

Immortal patriots! rise once more,
Defend your rights, defend your shore;
Let no rude foe with impious hand,
Let no rude foe with impious hand,
Invade the shrine where sacred lies,
Of toil and blood, the well-earned prize.
While off'ring peace, sincere and just,
In heav'n we place a manly trust,
That Truth and Justice will prevail,
And ev'ry scheme of bondage fail.

3.

Sound, sound the trump of fame!
Let Washington's great name
Ring thro' the world with loud applause,
Ring thro' the world with loud applause;
Let ev'ry clime to freedom dear
Listen with a joyful ear,
With equal skill, with God-like pow'r,
He governs in the fearful hour
Of horrid war; or guides with ease
The happier times of honest peace.

4.

Behold the Chief who now commands,
Once more to serve his country stands,
The rock on which the storm will beat,
The rock on which the storm will beat;
But armed in virtue, firm, and true,
His hopes are fixed on heav'n and you.
When hope was sinking in dismay,
When glooms obscured Columbia's day,
His steady mind, from changes free,
Resolved on death or liberty.


[Page 43: Music and Lyrics]

 

HAIL, COLUMBIA.

The passage of the Alien and Sedition Laws, in 1798, as an outcome of the trouble between France and England, aroused bitter partisan feelings between the Democrats and Federalists of the United States.

About this time a theatre was opened in Philadelphia with a benefit concert for Gilbert Fox, a rising young singer. One Saturday afternoon this young man called upon Joseph Hopkinson, a young lawyer, and asked him to write some patriotic words to the "President's March," a tune which had been composed at the time of Washington's first inauguration.

The following day he gave the words to Mr. Fox, who sang them at the concert Monday night. The song at once became popular. President Adams and many notable statesmen came to hear it. It was sung and whistled on the streets. Political differences were forgotten, and in the stanzas of "Hail, Columbia" the people caught new visions of their rights and duties as citizens of a free land.

MY BONNIE.

1.

My Bonnie is over the ocean,
My Bonnie is over the sea,
My Bonnie is over the ocean,
O bring back my Bonnie to me.

CHORUS.
Bring back, bring back,
Bring back my Bonnie to me, to me
Bring back, bring back
O bring back my Bonnie to me

2.

O blow, ye winds, over the ocean,
And blow, ye winds, over the sea,
O blow, ye winds, over the ocean,
And bring back my Bonnie to me.

3.

Last night as I lay on my pillow,
Last night as I lay on my bed,
Last night as I lay on my pillow,
I dreamed that my Bonnie was dead.

4.

The winds have blown over the ocean,
The winds have blown over the sea,
The winds have blown over the ocean,
And bro't back my Bonnie to me.

THE SOLDIER'S FAREWELL.

J. Kinkel.

1.

Ah, love, how can I leave thee?
The sad thought deep doth grieve me;
But know, whate'er befalls me,
I go where honor calls me.

CHORUS.
Farewell, farewell, my own true love!
Farewell, farewell, my own true love!

2.

Ne'er more shall I behold thee,
Or to this heart enfold thee;
In war's array appearing,
The foe's stern hosts are nearing.

3.

I'll think of thee with longing,
When tho'ts with tears come thronging;
And, on the field, if lying,
I'll breathe thy dear name, dying.


[Page 44: Music and Lyrics]

DARLING NELLY GRAY.

1.

There's a low green valley on the old Kentucky shore,
Where I've whiled many happy hours away,
A-sitting and a-singing by the little cottage door
Where lived my darling Nelly Gray.

CHORUS. (Verses 1-2.)
O my poor Nelly Gray, they have taken you away,
And I'll never see my darling any more;
I'm sitting by the river and I'm weeping all the day,
For you've gone from the old Kentucky shore.

2.

When the moon had climbed the mountain, and the stars were shining too,
Then I'd take my darling Nellie Gray,
And we'd float down the river in my little red canoe,
While my banjo sweetly I would play.

3.

My eyes are getting blinded, and I cannot see my way;
Hark! there's somebody knocking at the door;
O I hear the angels calling, and I see my Nelly Gray,
Farewell to the old Kentucky shore.

CHORUS. (Verse 3.)
O my darling Nelly Gray, up in heaven there, they say,
That they'll never take you from me any more;
I'm a coming–coming–coming, as the angels clear the way,
Farewell to the old Kentucky shore.

HOW CAN I LEAVE THEE.

1.

How can I leave thee!
How can I from thee part!
Thou only hast my heart,
Dear one, believe.
Thou hast this soul of mine
So closely bound to thine,
No other can I love
Save thee alone!

2.

Blue is a flow'ret
Called the Forget-me-not,
Wear it upon thy heart,
And think of me!
Flow'ret and hope may die,
Yet love with us shall stay,
That cannot pass away,
Dear one, believe.

3.

Would I a bird were!
Soon at thy side to be,
Falcon nor hawk would fear,
Speeding to thee.
When, by the fowler slain,
I at thy feet should lie,
Thou sadly shouldst complain,
Joyful I'd die.


[Page 45: Music and Lyrics]

THE BATTLE-CRY OF FREEDOM.

Geo. F. Root.

1.

Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys, we'll rally once again,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom;
We will rally from the hillside, we'll gather from the plain,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

CHORUS.
The Union forever, hurrah, boys, Hurrah!
Down with the traitor, Up with the star;
While we rally round the flag, boys, rally once again,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

2.

We are springing to the call of our brothers gone before,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom,
And we'll fill the vacant ranks with a million freemen more,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

3.

We will welcome to our numbers the loyal, true, and brave,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom,
And altho' they may be poor, not a man shall be a slave,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

4.

So we're springing to the call from the East and from the West,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom,
And we'll hurl the rebel crew from the land we love the best,
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom.

THE EVENING BELL.

1.

Hark! the pealing, softly stealing,
Evening bell,
Sweetly echoed down the dell.

2.

Welcome, welcome, is thy music,
Silv'ry bell,
Sweetly telling day's farewell.


[Page 46: Music and Lyrics]

MY MARYLAND.

1.

The despot's heel is on thy shore,
Maryland, my Maryland!
His torch is at thy temple door,
Maryland, my Maryland!
Avenge the patriotic gore
That flecked the streets of Baltimore,
And be the battle-queen of yore,
Maryland, my Maryland!

2.

Hark to an exiled son's appeal,
Maryland, my Maryland!
My Mother State, to thee I kneel,
Maryland, my Maryland!
For life and death, for woe and weal,
Thy peerless chivalry reveal,
And gird they beauteous limbs with steel,
Maryland, my Maryland!

3.

Thou wilt not cower in the dust,
Maryland, my Maryland!
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust,
Maryland, my Maryland!
Remember Carroll's sacred trust,
Remember Howard's warlike thrust,
And all thy slumb'rers with the just,
Maryland, my Maryland!

GOOD-NIGHT, LADIES.

1.

Good-night, ladies! Good-night, ladies! Good-night, ladies!
We're going to leave you now.

CHORUS.
Merrily we roll along,
Roll along, roll along.
Merrily we roll along,
Over the dark blue sea.

2.

Farewell, ladies! Farewell, ladies! Farewell, ladies!
We're going to leave you now.

3.

Sweet dreams, ladies! Sweet dreams, ladies! Sweet dreams, ladies!
We're going to leave you now.

TRAMP! TRAMP! TRAMP!

G. F. R.                               Geo. F. Root.

1.

In the prison cell I sit,
Thinking, Mother dear, of you,
And our bright and happy home so far away;
And the tears they fill my eyes
Spite of all that I can do,
Though I try to cheer my comrades and be gay.

CHORUS.
Tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching,
Cheer up comrades, they will come.
And beneath the starry flag
We shall breathe the air again
Of the free land in our own beloved home.

2.

In the battle front we stood,
When their fiercest charge they made,
And they swept us off, a hundred men or more;
But before we reached their lines
They were beaten back, dismayed,
And we heard the cry of vict'ry o'er and o'er.

3.

So, within the prison cell,
We are waiting for the day
That shall come to open wide the iron door;
And the hollow eye grows bright,
And the poor heart almost gay,
As we think of seeing home and friends once more.


[Page 47: Music and Lyrics]

TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP.–Con.

OH, WERT THOU IN THE CAULD BLAST.

Robert Burns.                               F. Mendelssohn.

1.

Oh, wert thou in the cauld blast,
On yonder lea, On yonder lea,
My plaidie to the angry airt,
I'd shelter thee, I'd shelter thee;
Or did misfortune's bitter storms
Around thee blaw, Around thee blaw,
Thy shield should be my bosom,
To share it a', To share it a'.

2.

Oh, were I in the wildest waste,
Sae black and bare, Sae black and bare,
The desert were a Paradise,
If thou wert there, If thou wert there;
Or were I monarch of the globe,
With thee to reign, With thee to reign,
The brightest jewel in my crown
Wad be my queen, Wad be my queen.


[Page 48: Music and Lyrics]

MASSA'S IN THE COLD GROUND.

1.

Round de meadows am a-ringing
De darkeys' mournful song,
While de mocking bird am singing,
Happy as de day am long.
Where de Ivy am a-creeping
O'er de grassy mound,
Dere old Massa am a-sleeping,
Sleeping in de cold, cold ground.

CHORUS.
Down in the cornfield
Hear dat mournful sound;
All de darkeys am a-weeping,
Massa's in de cold, cold ground.

2.

When de autumn leaves were falling,
When de days were cold,
'Twas hard to hear old Massa calling,
Cayse he was so weak and old.
Now de orange tree am blooming
On de sandy shore,
Now de summer days am coming,
Massa nebber calls no more.

3.

Massa make de darkeys love him,
Cayse he was so kind,
Now dey sadly weep above him,
Mourning cayse he leave dem behind.
I cannot work before to-morrow,
Cayse de tear-drops flow,
I try to drive away my sorrow,
Picking on de old banjo.

DIP, BOYS, DIP THE OAR.

Sarona.

1.

'Tis moonlight on the sea, boys,
Our boat is on the strand;
She bids us all be free, boys,
And seek a fairer land.

CHORUS.
Dip, boys, dip the oar,
Bid farewell to the dusky shore;
Freedom ours shall be,
As we cross the deep blue sea.

2.

The zephyrs woo the spray, boys,
Their laughter fills the air;
We'll bid them wake our song, boys,
And steal away our care.

3.

What tho' the dark rocks frown, boys,
Their home is on the shore;
When fairer lands appear, boys,
Our dangers will be o'er.


[Page 49: Music and Lyrics]

DIP, BOYS, DIP THE OAR.–Con.

WE'RE TENTING TO-NIGHT.

Walter Kittredge.

1.

We're tenting to-night on the old camp ground,
Give us a song to cheer
Our weary hearts, a song of home,
And friends we love so dear.

CHORUS. (Verses 1, 2, 3)
Many are the hearts that are weary to-night,
Wishing for the war to cease,
Many are the hearts looking for the right,
To see the dawn of peace.
Tenting to-night, tenting to-night,
Tenting on the old camp ground.

2.

We've been tenting to-night on the old camp ground,
Thinking of days gone by,
Of the loved ones at home that gave us the hand,
And the tear that said "good-bye!"

3.

We are tired of war on the old camp ground,
Many are dead and gone,
Of the brave and true who've left their homes,
Others been wounded long.

4.

We've been fighting to-day on the old camp ground,
Many are lying near;
Some are dead, and some are dying,
Many are in tears.

CHORUS. (Verse 4)
Many are the hearts that are weary to-night,
Wishing for the war to cease,
Many are the hearts looking for the right,
To see the dawn of peace.
Dying to-night, dying to-night,
Dying on the old camp ground.



[Page 50: Music and Lyrics]

UNCLE NED.

Stephen C. Foster.

1.

There was an old darkey, and his name was Uncle Ned,
And he died long ago, long ago;
He had no wool on the top of his head,
In the place where the wool ought to grow.

REFRAIN.
Then lay down the shovel and the hoe,
Hang up the fiddle and the bow;
For there's no more work for poor old Ned,
He's gone where the good darkies go.

2.

His fingers were long as the cane in the brake,
And he had no eyes for to see;
And he had no teeth for to eat a hoe cake,
So he had to let the hoecake be.

3.

One cold, frosty morning, old Ned died,
Massa's tears they fell like the rain;
For he knew when Ned was laid in the ground,
He'd never see his like again.

OH, BROAD LAND.

Oh, broad land, oh, fair land,
Oh, land that gave us birth,
Oh, near land, oh dear land,
Our home of all the earth;

We honor and praise thee,
Oh realm enrich'd by heav'n,
We love thee, we bless thee,
For priceless blessings give'n.

For freedom, for knowledge,
Alike to great and small,
For care and protection,
And equal rights to all.

HOP, HOP, HOP!

1.

Hop, hop, hop! Nimble as a top,
Where 'tis smooth and where 'tis stony,
Trudge along, my little pony,
Hop, hop, hop, hop, hop! Nimble as a top.

2.

Whoa, whoa, whoa! How like fun you go!
Very well, my little pony,
Safe's our jaunt thro' rough and stony,
Spare, spare, spare, spare, spare! Sure enough we're there.

3.

Here, here, here! Yes, my pony dear;
Now with oats and hay I'll treat you,
And with smiles will ever greet you,
Pony, pony dear! You, my pony dear.


[Page 51: Music and Lyrics]

THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER.

1.

'Tis the last rose of summer,
Left blooming alone;
All her lovely companions
Are faded and gone;
No flower of her kindred,
No rose bud is nigh,
To reflect back her blushes,
Or give sigh for sigh.

2.

I'll not leave thee, thou lone one,
To pine on the stem;
Since the lovely are sleeping,
Go sleep thou with them;
Thus kindly I scatter
Thy leaves o'er the bed
Where thy mates of the garden
Lie scentless and dead.

3.

So soon may I follow,
When friendships decay,
And from love's shining circle
The gems drop away;
When true hearts lie withered,
And fond ones have flown,
Oh, who would inhabit
This bleak world alone!

THE VACANT CHAIR.

N. S. W.                               Geo. F. Root.

1.

We shall meet, but we shall miss him,
There will be one vacant chair;
We shall linger to caress him,
While we breathe our evening prayer.
When a year ago we gathered,
Joy was in his mild blue eye,
But a golden chord is severed,
And our hopes in ruin lie.

D. C.–
We shall meet, but we shall miss him,
There will be one vacant chair,
We shall linger to caress him,
When we breathe our evening prayer.


2.

At our fireside, sad and lonely,
Often will the bosom swell
At remembrance of the story
How our noble Willie fell;
How he strove to bear our banner
Thro' the thickest of the fight;
And uphold our country's honor,
In the strength of manhood's might.

3.

True, they tell us wreaths of glory
Evermore will deck his brow,
But this soothes the anguish only
Sweeping o'er our heartstrings now.
Sleep to-day, Oh early fallen,
In thy green and narrow bed.
Dirges from the pine and cypress
Mingle with the tears we shed.


[Page 52: Music and Lyrics]

 

YANKEE DOODLE.

When the Revolutionary War began, the colonists had no national hymn. We are told that during the French and Indian War a Dr. Richard Shackburg in a spirit of derision gave to the poorly clad and awkward colonial soldiers the words and music of "Yankee Doodle," telling them it was a fine martial tune. When they played it the British were greatly amused. Twenty years after these same militiamen marched to victory at Lexington to this much derided tune, while their British teachers skulked behind fences or sought refuge in retreat. And five years after this Cornwallis marched to the same tune at Yorktown to surrender his sword and his army to General Washington. This tune, given in derision, has become the battle hymn of the new republic, and whenever, since that time, the life of the nation has been imperiled, its well-known strains have aroused the people whom it freed, to the defense of their homes and their country.

Little is known of the history of the tune or of the origin of its name. No doubt it is several hundred years old, but authorities disagree as to its origin. One says the tune was commonly used by the Spaniards. Another claims the song was sung by German harvesters who worked in Holland and who sang a harvest song to this well-known air. While another tells us that the Puritans of Cromwell's time were ridiculed as "Naukeys" in a stanza adapted to this same tune.

The word "Yankee" is sometimes given as an Indian corruption of the word English. Or, as has been said, it was a contemptuous term applied to the Puritans. Others claim it to be a cant word, expressing excellence, which originated in New England, but which finally came to be applied to the people of that region as a derisive epithet. "Doodle," according to the dictionaries, means a trifling or simple fellow.

The words which were applied to this tune by the colonists were little more than meaningless doggerel, and are little known now. It is not the lofty sentiment of the words, but the catchy, rollicking tune, and the sacred associations, which give this song its place among our national songs.

YANKEE DOODLE.

1.

Fath'r and I went down to camp,
Along with Captain Goodin',
And there we saw the men and boys
As thick as hasty puddin'.

CHORUS
Yankee doodle, keep it up,
Yankee doodle dandy,
Mind the music and the step,
And with the girls be handy.

2.

And there we see a thousand men,
As rich as Squire David;
And what they wasted ev'ry day,
I wish it could be saved.

3.

And there was Captain Washington
Upon a slapping stallion,
A-giving orders to his men:
I guess there was a million.

4.

And then the feathers on his hat,
They looked so very fine, ah!
I wanted peskily to get
To give to my Jemima.

5.

And there I see a swamping gun,
Large as a log of maple,
Upon a mighty little cart;
A load for father's cattle.

6.

And every time they fired it off,
It took a horn of powder;
It made a noise like father's gun,
Only a nation louder.

7.

And there I see a little keg,
Its head all made of leather,
They knocked upon't with little sticks,
To call the folks together.

8.

And Cap'n Davis had a gun,
He kind o' clapt his hand on't
And stuck a crooked stabbing-iron,
Upon the little end ou't.

9.

The troopers, too, would gallop up
And fire right in our faces;
It scared me almost half to death
To see them run such races.

10.

It scared me so I hooked it off,
Nor stopped, as I remember,
Nor turned about till I got home,
Locked up in mother's chamber.


[Page 53: Music and Lyrics]

FLAG OF THE FREE.

1.

Flag of the free, fairest to see,
Borne thro' the strife and the thunder of war,
Banner so bright with starry light,
Float ever proudly from mountain to shore.
Emblem of freedom, hope to the slave,
Spread thy fair folds but to shield and to save,

D. S.–While thro' the sky, loud rings the cry,
Union and Liberty! one evermore!


2.

Flag of the brave, long may it wave,
Chosen of God while His might we adore;
In Liberty's van, for manhood of man,
Symbol of Right thro' the years passing o'er.
Pride of our country, honored afar;
Scatter each cloud that would darken a star,

THERE'S MUSIC IN THE AIR.

1.

There's music in the air
Where the infant morn is nigh,
And faint its blush is seen
On the bright and laughing sky.

Many a harp's ecstatic sound,
With its thrill of joy profound,
While we list, enchanted there,
To the music in the air.

2.

There's music in the air
When the noontide's sultry beam
Reflects a golden light
On the distant mountain stream.

When beneath some grateful shade,
Sorrow's aching head is laid,
Sweetly to the spirit there
Comes the music in the air.

3.

There's music in the air
When the twilight's gentle sigh
Is lost on evening's breast,
As its pensive beauties die.

Then, oh, then the loved ones gone
Wake the pure celestial song,
Angel voices greet us there,
In the music in the air.


[Page 54: Music and Lyrics]

OLD BLACK JOE.

Stephen C. Foster.

1.

Gone are the days when my heart was young and gay.
Gone are my friends from the cotton fields away;
Gone from the earth to a better land, I know,
I hear their gentle voices calling, "Old Black Joe!"

CHORUS.
I'm coming, I'm coming,
For my head is bending low;
I hear those gentle voices calling, "Old Black Joe!"

2.

Why do I weep when my heart should feel no pain?
Why do I sigh that my friends come not again?
Grieving for forms now departed long ago,
I hear their gentle voices calling, "Old Black Joe!"

3.

Where are the hearts once so happy and so free?
The children so dear that I held upon my knee?
Gone to the shore where my soul has longed to go,
I hear their gentle voices calling, "Old Black Joe!"

CATCH THE SUNSHINE.

1.

Catch the sunshine! tho' it flickers
Thro' a dark and dismal cloud,
Tho' it falls so faint and feeble
On a heart with sorrow bowed.
Catch it quickly! it is passing,
Passing rapidly away;
It has only come to tell you
There is yet a brighter day.

2.

Catch the sunshine! tho' life's tempest
May unfurl its chilling blast,
Catch the little, hopeful straggler!
storms will not forever last.
Don't give up, and say "forsaken!"
Don't begin to say "I'm sad!"
Look! There comes a gleam of sunshine!
Catch it! oh, it seems so glad.

3.

Catch the sunshine! don't be grieving
O'er that darksome billow there!
Life's a sea of stormy billows,
We must meet them ev'rywhere.
Pass right thro' them! do not tarry,
Overcome the heaving tide,
There's a sparkling gleam of sunshine
Waiting on the other side.


[Page 55: Music and Lyrics]

CATCH THE SUNSHINE.–Con.

The Old Oaken Bucket.

SAMUEL WOODWORTH.

1.

How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood,
When fond recollection presents them to view!
The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood,
And ev'ry loved spot which my infancy knew:
The wide spreading pond, and the mill that stood by it,
The bridge and the rock where the cataract fell;
The cot of my father, the dairy house nigh it,
And e'en the rude bucket that hung in the well.

CHO.–
The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket,
The moss-covered bucket that hung in the well.


2.

That moss covered bucket I hailed as a treasure,
For often at noon, when returned from the field,
I found it the source of an exquisite pleasure,
The purest and sweetest that nature can yield.
How ardent I seized it, with hands that were glowing,
And quick to the white-pebbled bottom it fell.
Then soon, with the emblem of truth overflowing,
And dripping with coolness, it rose from the well.

3.

How sweet from the green, mossy brim to receive it,
As, poised on the curb, it inclined to my lips!
Not a full blushing goblet could tempt me to leave it,
Tho' filled with the nectar that Jupiter sips.
And now, far removed from the loved habitation,
The tear of regret will intrusively swell,
As fancy reverts to my father's plantation,
And sighs for the bucket that hangs in the well.

SCOTLAND'S BURNING. (Round.)

1. Scotland's burning, Scotland's burning,
2. Look out, look out!
3. Fire, fire, fire, fire!
4. Pour on water, Pour on water.


[Page 56: Music and Lyrics]

OLD FOLKS AT HOME.

Stephen C. Foster.

1.

'Way down upon the Swanee River,
Far, far away,
Dere's wha my heart is turning ever,
Dere's wha de old folks stay.
All up and down de whole creation,
Sadly I roam,
Still longing for de old plantation,
And for de old folks at home.

REFRAIN.
All the world is sad and dreary,
Ev'rywhere I roam;
D. S.– Oh! darkies, how my heart grows weary,
Far from de old folks at home.


2.

All roun' de little farm I wandered,
When I was young;
Den many happy days I squandered,
Many de songs I sung.
When I was playing with my brother,
Happy was I;
Oh! take me to my kind old mother,
There let me live and die.

3.

One little hut among de bushes,
One that I love,
Still sadly to my mem'ry rushes,
No matter where I rove.
When will I see de bees a-humming
All roun' de comb?
When will I hear de banjo tumming,
Down in my good old home?

STARS OF THE SUMMER NIGHT.

Longfellow.

1.

Stars of the summer night,
Far in yon azure deeps,
Hide, hide your golden light,
She sleeps, my lady sleeps;
She sleeps, She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

2.

Moon of the summer night,
Far down yon western steeps,
Sink, sink in silver light,
She sleeps, my lady sleeps;
She sleeps, She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

3.

Dreams of the summer night,
Tell her, her lover keeps
Watch while, in slumbers light,
She sleeps, my lady sleeps;
She sleeps, She sleeps, my lady sleeps.


[Page 57: Music and Lyrics]

COMIN' THRO' THE RYE.

ROBERT BURNS.

1.

If a body meet a body,
Comin' thro' the rye,
If a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry?

CHORUS.
Ev'ry lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha'e I;
Yet a' the lads they smile on me,
When comin' thro' the rye.

2.

If a body meet a body,
Comin' frae the town,
If a body greet a body,
Need a body frown?

3.

Amang the train there is a swain
I dearly love mysel';
But what's name, or where's his hame,
I dinna choose to tell.

AULD LANG SYNE.

1.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days of auld lang syne?

CHORUS.
|: For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne. :|

2.

We twa ha'e run aboot the braes,
And pu'd the gowans fine;
But we've wandered mony a weary foot
Sin' auld lang syne.

3.

We twa ha'e sported i' the burn
Frae mornin' sun till dine,
But seas between us braid ha'e roared
Sin' auld lang syne.

4.

And here's a hand, my trusty frien',
And gie's a hand o' thine;
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.


[Page 58: Music and Lyrics]

SWEET AND LOW.

ALFRED TENNYSON.                               J. BARNBY.

1.

Sweet and low, sweet and low;
Wind of the western sea,
Low, low, breathe and blow,
Wind of the western sea;
Over the rolling waters go, (Over the waters go,)
Come from the dying moon and blow, (Come from the moon and blow,)
Blow him again to me,
While my little one, while my pretty one sleeps.

2.

Sleep and rest, sleep and rest,
Father will come to thee soon;
Rest, rest, on mother's breast,
Father will come to thee soon;
Father will come to his babe in the nest, (Father will come to his babe,)
Silver sails all out of the west, (Silver sails out of the west,)
Under the silver moon
Sleep, my little one, sleep my pretty one, sleep.


[Page 59: Music and Lyrics]

FLOW GENTLY, SWEET AFTON.

1.

Flow gently, sweet Afton, amang thy green braes;
Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise;
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.
Thou stock-dove, whose echo resounds from the hill,
Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny dell,
Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear,
I charge you, disturb not my slumbering fair.

2.

How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighboring hills,
Far marked with the courses of clear-winding rills!
There daily I wander, as morn rises high,
My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye.
How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below,
Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow!
There oft, as mild evening creeps over the lea,
The sweet-scented birk shades my Mary and me.

3.

Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides,
And winds by the cot where my Mary resides!
How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave,
As, gath'ring sweet flow'rets, she stems thy clear wave!
Flow gently, sweet Afton, amang thy green braes,
Flow gently , sweet river, the theme of my lays:
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.


[Page 60: Music and Lyrics]

My Old Kentucky Home.

STEPHEN C. FOSTER.

1.

The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home,
'Tis summer, the darkies are gay;
The corn-top's ripe and the meadow's in the bloom,
While the birds make music all the day.
The young folks roll on the little cabin floor,
All merry, all happy, and bright;
By'm-by hard times comes a-knocking at the door,
Then my old Kentucky home, good-night!

CHORUS.
Weep no more, my lady,
O weep no more to-day!
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
For the old Kentucky home, far away.

2.

They hunt no more for the possum and the coon,
On meadow, the hill and the shore;
They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
On the bench by the old cabin door.
The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
With sorrow where all was delight;
The time has come when the darkies have to part,
Then my old Kentucky home, good-night!

3.

The head must bow and the back will have to bend,
Wherever the darkey may go;
A few more days, and the trouble all will end,
In the field where the sugar-canes grow;
A few more days for to tote the weary load,–
No matter, 'twill never be light;
A few more days till we totter on the road,
Then my old Kentucky home, good-night!


[Page 61: Music and Lyrics]

Those Evening Bells.

THOS. MOORE.

1.

Those evening bells! those evening bells!
How many a tale their music tells,
Of youth and home, and that sweet time
When last I heard their soothing chime.

2.

Those joyous hours have passed away;
And many a heart that then was gay,
Within the tomb now darkly dwells,
And hears no more these evening bells.

3.

And so 'twill be when I am gone,
That tuneful peal will still ring on,
While other bards shall walk these dells,
And sing your praise, sweet evening bells.

When the Swallows Homeward Fly.

FRANZ ABT.

1.

When the swallows homeward fly,
When the roses scattered lie,
When from neither hill nor dale
Chants the silv'ry nightingale;
In these words my bleeding heart
Would to thee its grief impart,
When I thus thy image lose,
Can I, ah, can I e'er know repose,
Can I, ah, can I e'er know repose.

2.

When the white swan southward roves,
To seek at noon the orange groves,
When the red tints of the west
Prove the sun has gone to rest;
In these words my bleeding heart
Would to thee its grief impart,
When I thus thy image lose,
Can I, ah, can I e'er know repose,
Can I, ah, can I e'er know repose.

3.

Hush, my heart! why thus complain?
Thou must, too, thy woes contain,
Tho' on earth no more we rove,
Loudly breathing words of love;
Thou, my heart, must find relief,
Yielding to these words belief;
I shall see thy form again,
Though to-day we part again,
Though to-day we part again.


[Page 62: Music and Lyrics]

 

THE BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC.

Julia Ward Howe, the author of this stirring war song, was born in New York, May 27, 1819, and was married to Dr. S. G. Howe in 1843.

In December, 1861, Dr. and Mrs. Howe, with a party of friends, paid a visit to Washington. Everything about the city had a martial aspect. The railroads were guarded by pickets, the streets were full of soldiers and all about could be seen the "watchfires of a hundred circling camps."

One day the party drove several miles from the city to see a review of the Federal soldiers. An attack by the Confederates caused much excitement and delayed their return. Finally they started back to Washington under an escort of soldiers, and to while away the time they sang war songs, among others, "John Brown."

Waking in the gray dawn of the following morning, Mrs. Howe found herself weaving together words to the music she had sung the day before. Fearing she might forget the lines if she slept again, she arose and wrote down the verses of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The poem was first published in the Atlantic Monthly for February, 1862. The verses were published without the author's name, and she received but five dollars for them.

Of this great hymn, a recent writer says, "Unlike many of the songs of the civil war, it contains nothing sectional, nothing personal, nothing of a temporary character. While we feel the beauty of the lines and their aspiration after freedom, even in the piping times of peace, it is only in the time of storm and stress that their full meaning shines out. Written with intense feeling, they seem to burn and glow when our own emotions are aroused."

The Quilting Party

1.

In the sky the bright stars glittered,
On the bank the pale moon shone;
And 'twas from Aunt Dinah's quilting party,
I was seeing Nellie home.

REFRAIN
I was seeing Nellie home,
I was seeing Nellie home;
And 'twas from Aunt Dinah's quilting party,
I was seeing Nellie home.

2.

On my arm a soft hand rested,
Rested light as ocean foam;
And 'twas from Aunt Dinah's quilting party,
I was seeing Nellie home.

3.

On my lips a whisper trembled,
Trembled till it dared to come;
And 'twas from Aunt Dinah's quilting party,
I was seeing Nellie home.

4.

On my life new hopes were dawning,
And those hopes have liv'd and grown;
And 'twas from Aunt Dinah's quilting party,
I was seeing Nellie home.

Do You Know The Name Of This Book? Guess it. Then turn to the front cover and fix its name, and the cover design, in your mind, because some day you will want additional copies of the book and it will be easier to get what you want if you can ask for it by name. Also remember it is the best song book for the price.


[Page 63: Music and Lyrics]

Battle Hymn Of The Republic.

JULIA WARD HOWE.                               Air: "John Brown's Body."

1.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord;
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword,
His truth is marching on.

CHORUS.
Glory! glory! Hallelujah!
Glory! glory! Hallelujah!
Glory! glory! Hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.

2.

I have seen Him in the watchfires of a hundred circling camps;
They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps;
I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps,
His day is marching on.

3.

I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel;
"As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal."
Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with His heel,
Since God is marching on.

4.

He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment seat;
O be swift, my soul, to answer Him! be jubilant, my feet!
Our God is marching on.

5.

In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea,
With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me;
As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free,
While God is marching on.


[Page 64: Music and Lyrics]

 

DIXIE LAND.

"Dixie Land," or "Dixie," as it is generally called, the most popular of the songs of the South, was written by Daniel D. Emmett, of Ohio. In 1859, Mr. Emmett was a member of "Bryant's Minstrels," then playing in New York. One Saturday evening he was asked by Mr. Bryant to furnish a new song to be used in the performances the following week. On Monday morning, Mr. Emmett took to the rehearsal the words and music of "Dixie." The song soon became the favorite all over the land. In 1860 an entertainment was given in New Orleans. The leader had some difficulty in selecting a march for his chorus. After trying several he decided upon "Dixie." It was taken up by the people, sung upon the streets and soon carried to the battlefields, where it became the great inspirational song of the Southern Army.

Many different words were written to the tune. Those by Albert Pike, of Arkansas, were much used, and are, perhaps, the most worthy of mention.

Like "Yankee Doodle," (with which it holds a close place), the original words of "Dixie" voice no great patriotic sentiment, and the music is not of a lofty character. Yet, like its companion, its notes stirred the hearts and crystallized souls who fought for the "Flag of Dixie."

Today, to the music of these two strange songs, there echoes the tread of a united people whose hearts are moved alike by the stirring strains, and who as they listen are ready to say with uplifted hands, bared brows, and reverent lips, "We give our heads and our hearts to God, and our Country."

DIXIE LAND.

Dan. Emmet.

1.

I wish I was in de land ob cotton,
Old times dar am not forgotten,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land whar' I was born in,
Early on one frosty mornin',
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

CHORUS.
Den I wish I was in Dixie,
Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!
In Dixie land, I'll take my stand
To lib and die in Dixie;
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie,
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie.

2.

Old Missus marry Will, de Weaber,
Willium was a gay deceaber;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
But when he put his arm around 'er
He smiled as fierce as a forty pounder,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

3.

His face was sharp as a butcher's cleaber,
But dat did not seem to greab 'er;
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Old Missus acted the foolish part,
And died for a man dat broke her heart,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

4.

Now here's a health to the next old Missus,
And all the gals dat want to kiss us;
Look away! etc.
But if you want to drive 'way sorrow,
Come and hear dis song to-morrow,
Look away! etc.

5.

Dar's buck-wheat cakes an' Injen batter,
Makes you fat or a little fatter;
Look away! etc.
Den hoe it down and scratch your grabble,
To Dixie's land I'm bound to trabble,
Look away! etc.


[Page 65: Music and Lyrics]

The Blue-Bells of Scotland.

1.

O where, and O where is your Highland laddie gone?
O where, and O where is your Highland laddie gone?
He's gone to fight the foe, for King George upon the throne;
And it's oh! in my heart, how I wish him safe at home!

2.

O where, and O where does your Highland laddie dwell?
O where, and O where does your Highland laddie dwell?
He dwelt in merry Scotland, at the sign of the Blue-Bell;
And it's oh! in my heart I love my laddie well.

3.

Suppose, and suppose that your Highland lad should die?
Suppose, and suppose that your Highland lad should die?
The bagpipes shall play o'er him, and I'd lay me down and cry;
But it's oh! in my heart that I wish he may not die.

Lead, Kindly Light.

JOHN HENRY NEWMAN.                               REV. J. B. DYKES.

1.

Lead, kindly Light, amid th'encircling gloom,
Lead Thou me on!
The night is dark, and I am far from home;
Lead Thou me on!
Keep Thou my feet; I do not ask to see
The distant scene; one step enough for me.

2.

I was not ever thus, nor prayed that Thou
Shouldst lead me on;
I loved to choose and see my path; but now
Lead Thou me on!
I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
Pride ruled my will. Remember not past years!

3.

So long Thy pow'r hath blest me, sure it still
Will lead me on.
O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, till
The night is gone,
And with the morn those angel faces smile,
Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile.


[Page 66: Music and Lyrics]

 

THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER.

The "Star-Spangled Banner" was composed under the following circumstances:

It was on the evening of September 13, 1814, during the "War of 1812" that a British fleet was anchored in Chesapeake Bay. A Dr. Beanes, an old resident of Upper Marlborough, Maryland, had been captured by the British and sent as a prisoner to Admiral Cochrane's flagship.

Francis Scott Key, a young lawyer of Baltimore, hearing of the misfortune of Dr. Beanes, who was his personal friend, hastened to the British commander to endeavor to have his friend released. The enemy was about to attack Fort McHenry, so refused to allow Mr. Key and Dr. Beanes to return until after the fort was captured.

All through the night of September 13, the bombardment was kept up, and in the light of the "rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air," they could see the American flag still waving over the old fort. And when, in the first rays of dawn of September 14, he still beheld the same glorious banner waving from its accustomed place, Francis Scott Key wrote the words of that wonderful song, "The Star-Spangled Banner."

The next day Key went ashore, and, after copying his poem, showed it to a friend and relative, Judge Nicholson, who saw its worth and at his suggestion it was printed. Soon after it was adapted to an old English air known as "To Anacreon in Heaven," the composition of which is credited to John Stafford Smith, who is supposed to have written the music some time between 1770 and 1775. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was first sung in public by Ferdinand Durang, an actor, in a tavern near the Holiday Street Theatre in Baltimore, Md.

The flag of Fort McHenry, which inspired this song, is still owned and kept by Mr. Ebers Appleton, of Yonkers, N. Y., whose grandfather was one of the soldiers at the fort. This flag was made by a daughter of Rebecca Young, who had made the first flag carried by the Revolutionary soldiers, and, in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the writing of the song, a buoy, on which is painted red and white stripes, and white stars on a blue field, has been anchored in Baltimore harbor as nearly as possible to the spot where Mr. Key, on the British ship, wrote the song, and, if you ever visit Baltimore, you should go out to see it.

Francis Scott Key was the son of John Ross Key, an officer of the Revolutionary army. He was born August 1, 1779, and died January 11, 1843, leaving "The Star-Spangled Banner" as a monument to his patriotic spirit, and an inspiration to his countrymen.

ANNIE LAURIE.

Lady John Scott.

1.

Maxwelton's braes are bonnie,
Where early fa's the dew,
And 'twas there that Annie Laurie
Gave me her promise true;
Gave me her promise true,
Which ne'er forgot will be,
And for bonnie Annie Laurie,
I'd lay me down and dee.

2.

Her brow is like the snawdrift,
Her throat is like the swan;
Her face it is the fairest
That e'er the sun shone on;
That e'er the sun shone on,
And dark blue is her e'e,
And for bonnie Annie Laurie,
I'd lay me down and dee.

3.

Like dew on th' gowan lying
Is th' fa' o' her fairy feet,
And like winds in summer sighing
Her voice is low and sweet;
Her voice is low and sweet,
And she's a' the world to me,
And for bonnie Annie Laurie,
I'd lay me down and dee.

THE STORY OF THE FLAG.

Every boy and girl should not only know the "Star-spangled Banner" by heart but should also know the interesting story of our flag.

Miss Virginia Baker, a writer of many of the volumes of the Instructor Literature Series, has written a book entitled "Story of the Flag." It tells of the different flags which were used before the Stars and Stripes was adopted. It contains drawings of them, and, altogether, it is a book that every boy and girl, young and old, will find very enjoyable reading. The price of it in limp cloth covers, postpaid, is ten cents. Order it from the publishers of this song book.

 


[Page 67: Music and Lyrics]

THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER.

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY                               JOHN STAFFORD SMITH

1.

Oh, say! can you see, by the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
Oh, say, does that Star-spangled Banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

2.

On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines on the stream;
'Tis the Star-spangled Banner, oh, long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

3.

Oh, thus be it ever when freemen shall stand
Between their loved homes and the war's desolation!
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land
Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust!"
And the Star-spangled Banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!


[Page 68: Music and Lyrics]

IN THE GLOAMING.

META ORRED
ANNIE F. HARRISON.

1.

In the gloaming oh, my darling! when the lights are dim and low,
And the quiet shadows, falling, softly come and softly go,
When the winds are sobbing faintly with a gentle, unknown woe,
Will you think of me and love me, As you did once long ago?

2.

In the gloaming oh, my darling! think not bitterly of me!
Though I passed away in silence, left you lonely, set you free.
For my heart was crushed with longing; what had been could never be.
It was best to leave you thus, dear, Best for you and best for me.
It was best to leave you thus, Best for you and best for me.

SONG OF A THOUSAND YEARS.

H. C. W.                               Henry C. Work.

1.

Lift up your eyes, desponding freemen!
Fling to the winds your needless fears!
He who unfurled your beauteous banner,
Says it shall wave a thousand years!

CHORUS.
"A thousand years," my own Columbia!
'Tis the glad day so long foretold!
'Tis the glad morn whose early twilight
Washington saw in times of old.

2.

What if the clouds, one little moment,
Hide the blue sky where morn appears;
When the bright sun, that tints them crimson,
Rises to shine a thousand years!

3.

Envious foes, beyond the ocean,
Little we heed your threat'ning sneers;
Little will they–our children's children–
When you are gone a thousand years.

4.

Haste thee along, thou glorious noon-day!
Oh, for the eyes of ancient seers!
Oh, for the faith of Him who reckons
Each of His days a thousand years.


[Page 69: Music and Lyrics]

SONG OF A THOUSAND YEARS.–Con.

CRADLE SONG.

KARL SIMROCK. JOHANNES BRAHMS. Op. 49, No. 4.
Translated by Arthur Westbrook.            (To be sung with gentle motion.)
1.

Lullaby and goodnight!
With roses bedight,–
Creep into thy bed,
There pillow thy head
If God will thou shalt wake,
When the morning doth break,
If God will thou shalt wake,
When the morning doth break.

2.

Lullaby and goodnight!
Those blue eyes close tight,–
Bright angels are near,
So sleep without fear,
They will guard thee from harm,
With fair dreamland's sweet charm,
They will guard thee from harm,
With fair dreamland's sweet charm.


[Page 70: Music and Lyrics]

 

COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN.

Though there has been considerable controversy over who wrote this song it is now pretty well established as a fact that the idea and name of the song originated with David T. Shaw, and that at Mr. Shaw's suggestion the words and music were written by Thomas A. Becket, an actor. The hymn was sung for the first time in Chestnut Street Theatre, Philadelphia, in 1843.

The song has been adapted and used by the English as "Brittania, the Gem of the Ocean," and in America it frequently goes by the title, "The Red, White, and Blue," and "The Army and Navy Song."

COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN.

1.

O Columbia, the gem of the ocean,
The home of the brave and the free,
The shrine of each patriot's devotion,
A world offers homage to thee.
Thy mandates make heroes assemble,
When Liberty's form stands in view;
Thy banners make tyranny tremble
When borne by the red, white and blue,
When borne by the red, white and blue,
When borne by the red, white and blue,
Thy banners make tyranny tremble
When borne by the red, white and blue.

2.

When war winged its wide desolation,
And threatened the land to deform,
The ark then of freedom's foundation,
Columbia, rode safe thro' the storm:
With the garlands of vict'ry around her,
When so proudly she bore her brave crew,
With her flag proudly floating before her,
The boast of the red, white and blue,
The boast of the red, white and blue,
The boast of the red, white and blue,
With her flag proudly floating before her,
The boast of the red, white and blue.

3.

The star-spangled banner bring hither,
O'er Columbia's true sons let it wave;
May the wreaths they have won never wither,
Nor its stars cease to shine on the brave:
May the service, united, ne'er sever,
But hold to their colors so true;
The army and navy forever,
Three cheers for the red, white and blue,
Three cheers for the red, white and blue,
Three cheers for the red, white and blue,
The army and navy forever.
Three cheers for the red, white and blue.


[Page 71: Music and Lyrics]

COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN.–Con.

* The National Education Association recommends the following version for the third verse.

 

The Star-Spangled Banner bring hither,
O'er Columbia's true sons let it wave;
May the wreaths they have won never wither,
Nor its stars cease to shine on the brave;
May the service united ne'er sever,
But hold to their colors so true;
The army and navy forever,
Three cheers for the red, white and blue.
The army and navy forever,
Three cheers for the red, white and blue.


 

FIRST STARS AND STRIPES ON THE OCEAN.

On the very day (June 14, 1777) (now celebrated as Flag Day) on which Congress passed the resolution authorizing the national flag, Captain John Paul Jones was appointed Commander of the "Ranger," which was fitting out for service at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

When this this news reached Portsmouth, some of the young ladies of that place (Tradition names five,–Mary Langdon, Augusta Pierce, Caroline Chandler, Dorothy Hall and Helen Seavey) made a flag from "slices of their best silk gowns" for presentation to Jones, who was in Boston at the time. He made the trip from Boston to Portsmouth for the purpose of receiving and displaying the colors, which event occurred, so it is recorded, July 4th, 1777, the first anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.

Other events of historical interest in connection with this flag was its first appearance on the ocean, November 1st, 1777, when the "Ranger" set sail to carry the message, "Burgoyne has surrendered," to the King of France, the voyage lasting 3 days, Jones landing at Nantes, December 2d, 1777. It received the first salute by a foreign naval power, February 14th, 1778, in Brest Roads when the "Ranger" sailed through the French fleet. It waved over the "Ranger" when she defeated the "Drake," and the "Bon Homme Richard" when she conquered the "Serapis."

Augustus C. Buell in his "History of Paul Jones" says: "When Jones returned to this country in February, 1781, he found Miss Langdon of the 'quilting party' a guest of the Ross family whose house was always his home in Philadelphia. By way of apology he explained to her that his most ardent desire had been to bring that flag back to America, with all its glories, and give it back untarnished into the fair hands that had given it to him nearly four years before. "But, Miss Mary," he said, "I couldn't bear to strip it from the poor old ship in her last agony, nor could I deny to my dead on her decks, who had given their lives to keep it flying, the glory of taking it with them."

"You did exactly right, Commodore," exclaimed Miss Langdon, "that flag is just where we all wish it to be,–flying at the bottom of the sea over the only ship that ever sunk in Victory."

TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR.

JANE TAYLOR.

1.

Twinkle, twinkle, little star;
How I wonder what you are,
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky!

CHORUS.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.

2.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle all the night.

3.

Then the trav'ller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

4.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
While you thro' my window peep,
And you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.


[Page 72: Music and Lyrics]

BLUE-EYED MARY.

1.

"Come, tell me, blue-eyed stranger, Say, whither dost thou roam?
O'er this wild world a ranger, Hast thou no friends, no home?"
"They called me blue-eyed Mary, When friends and Fortune smiled;
But, ah! how fortunes vary – I now am Sorrow's child."

2.

"Come here, I'll buy thy flowers, And ease thy hapless lot;
Still wet with vernal showers, I'll buy forget-me-not."
2 ( "Kind sir, then take these posies, They're fading like my youth,;
    But never, like these roses, Shall wither Mary's truth.
Born thus to weep my fortune, Tho' poor, I'll virtuous prove;
    I early learned this caution, that pity is not love."

3.

"Look up, thou poor forsaken, I'll give thee house and home,
And if I'm not mistaken, Thou'lt never wish to roam."
"Once more I'm happy Mary, Once more has Fortune smiled;
Who ne'er from virtue vary, May yet be Fortune's child."

SCENES THAT ARE BRIGHTEST.

1.

Scenes that are brightest may charm for a while;
Hearts which are lightest, and eyes that smile.
Yet o'er them above us, though nature beam,
With none to love us, how sad they seem!
With none to love us, how sad they seem!

2.

Words cannot scatter the thoughts we fear,
For though they flatter, they mock the ear;
Hopes will still deceive us with tearful cost,
And when they leave us the heart is lost!
And when they leave us the heart is lost.


[Page 73: Music and Lyrics]

 

HOME, SWEET HOME.

While the United States has no great war song which ranks with those of other nations, it has one song of peace that reaches not only the hearts of its own people, but touches a responsive chord in the hearts of the whole world. The song is "Home, Sweet Home."

Its author, John Howard Payne, was born in New York City, June 9, 1792, and died at Tunis, April 10, 1852. Payne's mother died when he was thirteen, and after that the author of the world's home song never knew what it meant to have a home of his own.

At the age of thirteen, Payne became a clerk in a mercantile house. At seventeen he went on the stage and achieved great success in the large eastern cities. He was twenty-one when he appeared in Drury Lane Theatre, London. He lived abroad for twenty years, and although he seemed to have been diligent and fairly successful, he was poor and often wretched.

He wrote several successful dramas, among them "Clari, the Maid of Milan." At the suggestion of the manager of Covent Garden Theater, the play was changed into an opera and the words of "Home, Sweet Home," were introduced into it. The song was a great success and enriched all who handled it except its author. He did not even receive the twenty-five pounds which was his share of the proceeds from the sale of the manuscript.

In 1822 Payne returned to America. Later he was appointed consul to Tunis and died there in 1852.

In 1883, through the generosity of W. W. Corcoran, the remains of John Howard Payne were brought to his native land and buried at Oak Hill cemetery, Washington, D. C.

HOME, SWEET HOME.

John Howard Payne.                               H. R. Bishop.

1.

'Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam,
Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home;
A charm from the skies seems to hallow us there,
Which, seek thro' the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere.

REFRAIN.
Home, home, sweet, sweet home,

D. S.–There's no place like home,
Oh, there's no place like home.


2.

I gaze on the moon as I tread the drear wild,
And feel that my mother now thinks of her child,
As she looks on that moon from our own cottage door,
Thro' the woodbine whose fragrance shall cheer me no more.
Home, etc.

3.

An exile from home splendor dazzles in vain;
Oh, give me my lowly thatched cottage again;
The birds singing gaily, that came at my call:
Give me them, and that peace of mind dearer than all.

THE FARMER.

I'm glad I am a farmer, the sturdy plough to wield,
Or reap and bind the ripen'd grain that waves in yonder field.
I'm glad I am a farmer, his heart is always gay
As merrily his song rings out amid the new-mown hay.
O happy is the farmer, for when the day is o'er,
The ev'ning shadows gather round, that he may work no more.
How peacefully around him, soft sleep her curtain throws,
There's nothing half so tranquil as the laborer's repose.


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KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN.

1.

Kathleen Mavourneen, the gray dawn is breaking,
The horn of the hunter is heard on the hill;
The lark from her light wing the bright dew is shaking;
Kathleen Mavourneen, what! slumb'ring still?
Kathleen Mavourneen, what! slumb'ring still?
Or hast thou forgotten how soon we must sever?
Oh! hast thou forgotten this day we must part?
It may be for years, and it may be forever;
Then why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever;
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?

2.

Kathleen Mavourneen, awake from thy slumbers;
The blue mountains glow in the sun's golden light;
Ah! where is the spell that once hung on my numbers,
Arise in thy beauty, thou star of my night;
Arise in thy beauty, thou star of my night!
Mavourneen, Mavourneen, my sad tears are falling,
To think that from Erin and thee I must part!
It may be for years, and it may be forever;
Then why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever;
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?

When you realize that the songs in this book, if bought separately in sheet form, would cost from ten to fifty cents each and that you get all of them (170) for 15 cents, you know it's mighty big value. Why not tell others about it?


[Page 75: Music and Lyrics]

KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN.–Con.

THE HEART BOWED DOWN.

1.

The heart bow'd down by weight of woe,
To weakest hopes will cling,
To thought and impulse while they flow,
That can no comfort bring, that can, that can no comfort bring;
To those exciting scenes will blend,
O'er pleasure's pathway thrown;
But mem'ry is the only friend
That grief can call its own,
That grief can call its own,
That grief can call its own.

2.

The mind will in its worst despair,
Still ponder o'er the past,
On moments of delight that were
Too beautiful to last; that were too beautiful to last;
To long departed years extend
Its visions with them flown;
For mem'ry is the only friend
That grief can call its own,
That grief can call its own,
That grief can call its own.


[Page 76: Music and Lyrics]

ONWARD, CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS.

Sabine Baring-Gould.                               Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan.

1.

Onward, christian soldiers!
Marching as to war,
With the cross of Jesus
Going on before.
Christ, the royal Master,
Leads against the foe;
Forward into battle,
See, his banners go!

CHORUS.
Onward, Christian soldiers!
Marching as to war,
With the cross of Jesus
Going on before.

2.

At the sign of triumph
Satan's host doth flee;
On, then, Christian soldiers,
On to victory!
Hell's foundations quiver
At the shout of praise;
Brothers, lift your voices,
Loud your anthems raise.

3.

Like a mighty army
Moves the Church of God;
Brothers, we are treading
Where the saints have trod;
We are not divided,
All one body we,
One in hope and doctrine,
One in charity.

4.

Crowns and thrones may perish,
Kingdoms rise and wane,
But the Church of Jesus
Constant will remain;
Gates of hell can never
'Gainst that Church prevail;
We have Christ's own promise,
And that cannot fail.

5.

Onward then, ye people!
Join our happy throng,
Blend with ours your voices
In the triumph song;
Glory, laud and honor
Unto Christ the King,
This thro' countless ages
Men and angels sing.

WORK, FOR THE NIGHT IS COMING.

WORK SONG                               LOWELL MASON.

1.

Work, for the night is coming,
Work through the morning hours;
Work, while the dew is sparkling,
Work 'mid springing flowers.
Work, when the day grows brighter,
Work in the glowing sun;
Work, for the night is coming,
When man's work is done.

2.

Work for the night is coming,
Work through the sunny noon;
Fill brightest hours with labor,
Rest comes sure and soon.
Give every flying minute
Something to keep in store;
Work, for the night is coming,
When man works no more.

3.

Work, for the night is coming,
Under the sunset skies;
While their bright tints are glowing,
Work, for daylight flies.
Work till the last beam fadeth,
Fadeth to shine no more;
Work while the night is darkening,
When man's work is o'er.


[Page 77: Music and Lyrics]

MARSEILLAISE HYMN.

1.

Ye sons of France, awake to glory!
Hark! hark! what myriads bid you rise!
Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary,
Behold their tears and hear their cries!
Behold their tears and hear their cries!
Shall hateful tyrants, mischief breeding,
With hireling hosts, a ruffian band,
Affright and desolate the land,
While peace and liberty lie bleeding?

CHORUS.
To arms, to arms, ye brave! Th' avenging sword unsheathed!
March on, march on! all hearts resolved on victory or death!

2.

With luxury and pride surrounded,
The vile insatiate despots dare,
Their thirst for gold and pow'r unbounded,
To mete and vend the light and air,
To mete and vend the light and air.
Like beasts of burden would they load us,
Like gods would bid their slaves adore;
But man is man, and who is more?
Then shall they longer lash and goad us?

3.

O Liberty! can man resign thee,
Once having felt thy gen'rous flame?
Can dungeons, bolts and bars confine thee?
Or whips thy noble spirit tame?
Or whips thy noble spirit tame?
Too long the world has wept bewailing
That falsehood's dagger tyrants wield;
But freedom is our sword and shield,
And all their arts are unavailing.


[Page 78: Music and Lyrics]

THE BULL-DOG.

1.

Oh! the bull-dog on the bank
And the bull-frog in the pool.
The bull-dog called the bull-frog
A green old water fool.

CHORUS.
Singing tra la la la    la la la, (leil-i-o)
Singing tra la la la    la la la, (leil-i-o)
Singing tra la la    la la la,    singing tra la la    la la la,
Tra la la la,    tra la la la,    tra la la    la la la, (leil-i-o)

2.

Oh! the bull-dog stooped to catch him
And the snapper caught his paw.
The pollywog died laughing,
To see him wag his jaw.

3.

Says the monkey to the owl:
"Oh! what'll you have to drink?"
"Why, since you are so very kind,
I'll take a bottle of ink."

4.

Oh! the bull-dog in the yard,
And the tom-cat on the roof,
Are practicing the Highland Fling,
And singing opera bouffe.

5.

Says the tom-cat to the dog:
"Oh! set your ears agog,
For Jule's about to tete-a-tete
With Romeo, incog."

6.

Says the bull-dog to the cat:
"Oh! what do you think they're at?
They're spooning in the dead of night:
But where's the harm in that?"

7.

Pharaoh's daughter on the bank,
Little Moses in the pool,
Pharaoh's daughter on the bank,
Little Moses in the pool.
Pharaoh's daughter on the bank,
Little Moses in the pool.
She fished him out with a telegraph pole,
And sent him off to school.


[Page 79: Music and Lyrics]

COUSIN JEDEDIAH.

H. S. Thompson.

1.

Oh! Jacob, get the cows home and put them in the pen,
For the cousins are a-coming to see us all again;
The dowdy's in the pan, and the turkey's on the fire,
And we all must get ready for Cousin Jedediah.

CHORUS.
Cousin Jedediah,
There's Hezekiah,
And Azariah,
And Aunt Sophia,
And Jedediah,
All coming here to tea;
Oh! won't we have a jolly time,
Oh! won't we have a jolly time!
Jerusha, put the kettle on,
We'll all take tea.

2.

Now, Obed, wash your face, boy, and tallow up your shoes,
While I go to see Aunt Betty, and tell her all the news;
And, Kitty, slick your hair, and put on your Sunday gown,
For Cousin Jedediah comes right from Boston town.

3.

And, Job, you peel the onions, and wash and fix the 'taters,
We'll have them on the table in those shiny painted waiters;
Put on your bran new boots, and those trousers with the straps,
Aunt Sophia'll take a shine to you, if you look real slick, perhaps.

4.

Tell Josh to put the colt in the double-seated chaise,
Let him just card down the cattle, give them a little hay;
I'll wear my nice new bell-crown I bought of old Uriah,
And I guess we'll astonish our Cousin Jedediah.

If your choral society hasn't a supply of this book, show a copy to your leader and suggest that a supply be purchased so that you will have plenty of copies on hand when needed. See title page for price.


[Page 80: Music and Lyrics]

CHRISTMAS CAROL.

E. H. Sears.                               R. S. Willis.

1.

It came upon the midnight clear,
That glorious song of old,
From angels bending near the earth,
To touch their harps of gold:
"Peace on the earth, good will to men,
From heaven's all gracious King;"
The world in solemn stillness lay
To hear the angels sing.

2.

Still thro' the cloven skies they come,
With peaceful wings unfurled;
And still their heav'nly music floats
O'er all the weary world:
Above its sad and lowly plains
They bend on hov'ring wing,
And ever o'er its Babel sounds
The blessed angels sing.

3.

For lo! the days are hast'ning on,
By prophets seen of old,
When with the ever circling years
Shall come the time foretold;
When the new heav'n and earth shall own
The Prince of Peace their King,
And the whole world send back the song
Which now the angels sing.

HARK! THE HERALD ANGELS SING.

Chas. Wesley–1739                               Mendelssohn.

1.

Hark! the herald angels sing,
"Glory to the newborn King!
Peace on earth, and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled!"
Joyful, all ye nations, rise,
Join the triumph of the skies;
With th' angelic host proclaim,
"Christ is born in Bethlehem!"

CHORUS.
Hark! the herald angels sing,
"Glory to the newborn King!"

2.

Christ, by highest heav'n adored;
Christ, the everlasting Lord;
Late in time, behold Him come,
Offspring of the favored one.
Veiled in flesh, the Godhead see;
Hail th' incarnate Deity:
Pleased, as man with men to dwell,
Jesus our Immanuel!

3.

Hail! the heav'n-born Prince of Peace!
Hail! the Son of Righteousness!
Light and life to all He brings,
Ris'n with healing in His wings.
Mild He lays His glory by,
Born that man no more may die:
Born to raise the sons of earth,
Born to give them second birth.


[Page 81: Music and Lyrics]

HARK, THE HERALD ANGELS SING.–Con.

GOOD MORNING TO YOU.

GOOD-BYE TO YOU–HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU.

(To be sung standing.)

Good morning to you,
Good morning to you,
Good morning, dear children,
Good morning to all.


[Page 82: Music and Lyrics]

JINGLE, BELLS.

J. Pierpont.

1.

Dashing through the snow
In a one horse open sleigh,
O'er the fields we go,
Laughing all the way;
Bells on bob-tail ring,
Making spirits bright,
What fun it is to ride and sing
A sleighing song to night!

Chorus
Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way!
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one-horse open sleigh!
Jingle bells! jingle bells! Jingle all the way!
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one-horse open sleigh!

2.

A day or two ago
I thought I'd take a ride,
And soon Miss Fanny Bright
Was seated by my side:
The horse was lean and lank,
Misfortune seemed his lot,
He got into a drifted bank
And we, we got upsot.

3.

Now the ground is white,
Go it while you're young,
Take the girls to night,
And sing this sleighing song;
Just get a bob tailed nag,
Two forty for his speed,
Then hitch him to an open sleigh,
And crack! you'll take the lead.


[Page 83: Music and Lyrics]

JINGLE BELLS.–Con.

THE BELL DOTH TOLL.

The bell doth toll,
Its echoes roll,
I know the sound full well;
I love its ringing,
For it calls to singing,
With its bim, bim, bim, bome bell,
Bim, bome, bim, bim, bim, bome bell.

MUSICAL ALPHABET.

1.

Come, dear teacher, hear me say what I can of A, B, C:
A B C D   E F G,   H I J K   L M N O P;
Q R S and T U V, W (double you) and X Y Z.
Now you've heard my ABC, Tell me what you think of me.

2.

Now my Alphabet is through, will you hear my sister too?
A B C D   E F G, She has said them all to me;
Q R S and T U V, W (double you) and X Y Z.
Now we've said our A B C, Let us have a kiss from thee.


[Page 84: Music and Lyrics]

CAN A LITTLE CHILD, LIKE ME?

Mary Mapes Dodge.                               W. R. Bassford.

1.

Can a little child, like me,
Thank the Father fittingly?
Yes, oh, yes! be good and true,
Patient, kind, in all you do;
Love the Lord, and do your part;
Learn to say with all your heart:

CHORUS.
Father, we thank Thee!
Father, we thank Thee!
Father in heaven, we thank Thee!

2.

For the fruit upon the tree,
For the birds that sing of Thee,
For the earth in beauty drest,
Father, mother, and the rest;
For Thy precious, loving care,
For Thy bounty ev'rywhere,

3.

For the sunshine warm and bright,
For the day and for the night;
For the lessons of our youth,
Honor, gratitude and truth;
For the love that met us here,
For the home and for the cheer,

4.

For our comrades and our plays,
And our happy holidays;
For the joyful work and true
That a little child may do,
For our lives but just begun;
For the great gift of Thy Son,

LORD, DISMISS US WITH THY BLESSING.

W. SHIRLEY, 1774.
"SICILIAN MARINERS' HYMN."

1.

Lord, dismiss us with Thy blessing,
Fill our hearts with joy and peace,
Let us each, Thy love possessing,
Triumph in redeeming grace.
O refresh us, O refresh us,
Traveling through this wilderness.

2.

Thanks we give, our adoration
For the Gospel's joyful sound;
May the fruits of Thy salvation
In our hearts and lives abound:
May Thy presence, May Thy presence
With us evermore be found.


[Page 85: Music and Lyrics]

IF YOU HAVE A PLEASANT THOUGHT.

R. Morris.                               H. R. Palmer.

1.

If you have a pleasant tho't,
Sing it, sing it;
As the birds sing in their sport,
Sing it from the heart:
Does the Holy Spirit move
For the children of His love,
Sing, and point the home above,
Sing it from the heart.

CHORUS.
Singing, singing from the heart!
Oh, the joy our songs impart!
Jesus, bless the tuneful art,
Singing from the heart.

2.

Ev'ry gracious deed of His,
Sing it, sing it;
Nothing sounds so well as this.
Sing it from the heart:
How the Lord walked on the wave,
Rescued Lazarus from the grave,
Died our guilty souls to save,
Sing it from the heart.

3.

Are you weary, are you sad?
Sing it, sing it;
Make yourselves and others glad,
Sing it from the heart:
Angels now before His face
Sing of Christ's redeeming grace,
Give the Savior endless praise,
Sing it from the heart.


[Page 86: Music and Lyrics]

KIND WORDS CAN NEVER DIE.

1.

Kind words can never die, Cherished and blest,
God knows how deep they lie, Lodged in the breast;
Like childhood's simple rhymes, Said o'er a thousand times;
Go through all years and climes, The heart to cheer.
Kind words can never die, never die, never die;
Kind words can never die, no, never die.

2.

Childhood can never die– Wrecks of the past
Float o'er the memory, Bright to the last.
Many a happy thing, Many a daisy spring,
Floats on time's ceaseless wing, Far, far away.
Childhood can never die, never die, never die;
Childhood can never die, no, never die.

3.

Sweet thoughts can never die, Though, like the flow'rs,
Their brightest hues may fly In wintry hours,
But when the gentle dew Gives them their charms anew,
With many an added hue, They bloom again.
Sweet thoughts can never die, never die, never die;
Sweet thoughts can never die, no, never die.

4.

Our souls can never die, Though in the tomb
We may all have to lie, Wrapt in its gloom.
What though the flesh decay, Souls pass in peace away,
Live though eternal day, With Christ above.
Our souls can never die, never die, never die;
Our souls can never die, no, never die.

GOD BE WITH YOU TILL WE MEET AGAIN.

1.

God be with you till we meet again,
By His counsels guide, uphold you,
With His sheep securely fold you,
God be with you till we meet again.

CHORUS.
Till we meet, till we meet,
Till we meet at Jesus' feet;
Till we meet, till we meet,
God be with you till we meet again.

2.

God be with you till we meet again,
'Neath His wings protecting hide you,
Daily manna still divide you,
God be with you till we meet again.

3.

God be with you till we meet again,
When life's perils thick confound you,
Put His arms unfailing round you,
God be with you till we meet again.

4.

God be with you till we meet again,
Keep love's banner floating o'er you,
Smite death's threatening wave before you,
God be with you till we meet again.


[Page 87: Music and Lyrics]

GOD BE WITH YOU TILL WE MEET AGAIN.–Con.

COME, THOU ALMIGHTY KING.

1.

Come, Thou Almighty King,
Help us Thy name to sing,
Help us to praise:
Father, all-glorious,
O'er all victorious,
Come and reign over us,
Ancient of Days.

2.

Come, Thou incarnate Word,
Gird on Thy mighty sword,
Our pray'r attend;
Come, and Thy people bless,
And give Thy word success;
Spirit of holiness,
On us descend!

3.

To Thee, great One in Three,
The highest praises be,
Hence, evermore;
Thy sov'reign majesty,
May we in glory see,
And to eternity
Love and adore.


[Page 88: Music and Lyrics]

HOLY. HOLY. HOLY.

1.

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
Early in the morning our song shall rise to Thee.
Holy, holy, holy,! merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity!

2.

Holy, holy, holy! all saints adore Thee,
Casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea;
Cherubim and Seraphim falling down before Thee,
Which wert, and art, and evermore shalt be.

3.

Holy, holy, holy! though the darkness hide Thee,
Though the eye of sinful man Thy glory may not see,
Only Thou art holy! there is none beside Thee
Perfect in power, in love, and purity.

4.

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
All thy works shall praise Thy Name, in earth, and sky, and sea.
Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity!

HAPPY GREETING TO ALL.

CHILDHOOD SONG.

1.

Come, children, and join in our festival song,
And hail the sweet joys which this day brings along;
We'll join our glad voices in one hymn of praise,
To God, who has kept us, and lengthened our days.

Chorus.
Happy greeting to all!
Happy greeting to all,
Happy greeting, happy greeting, happy greeting to all!

2.

Our Father in Heaven, we lift up to Thee,
Our voice of thanksgiving, our glad jubilee;
Oh, bless us, and guide us, dear Saviour, we pray,
That from Thy blest precepts we never may stray.

3.

And if, ere this glad year has drawn to a close,
Some loved one among us in death shall repose,
Grant, Lord, that the dear one in Heaven may dwell,
In the mansions of Jesus, where all shall be well.


[Page 89: Music and Lyrics]

HAPPY GREETING TO ALL.–Con.

TO AND FRO.

M. T.                               Henry Tucker.

1.

To and fro, to and fro, hear the tread of little children,
As they go, as they go, busy march of busy feet!
Here and there, ev'rywhere, joyous songs we're singing;
Loud and clear, full of cheer, happy tones are ringing.

REFRAIN:
To and fro, to and fro, hear the tread of little children,
As they go, as they go, busy march of busy feet!

2.

To and fro, to and fro, hear the tread of little children,
As they go, as they go, busy march of busy feet!
We will tell, we will tell, of the wondrous story
While we raise songs of praise, to our Lord in glory.

3.

To and fro, to and fro, hear the tread of little children,
As they go, as they go, busy march of busy feet!
Thro' the world, thro' the world, doing angels' duty,
Bright and fair, bright and fair, clothed in angel beauty.


[Page 90: Music and Lyrics]

TO THE FRIENDS WE LOVE.

1.

Come cheerful companions, unite in our song,
Here's to the friends we love!
May bountiful Heaven, their sweet lives prolong,
Here's to the friends we love!

CHORUS.
Oh, sympathy deepens whenever we sing;
Friendship's the mystical word in our ring;
Here's to our friends!
Here's to our friends!
Here's to the friends we love!

2.

And first, the dear parents who watch o'er our youth,
They are the friends we love!
And next are the teachers who tell us of truth.
They are the friends we love!

3.

Next, think of the absent to all of us dear,
They are the friends we love!
Oh, would they were with us, we would they were here!
They are the friends we love!

4.

And here's to the good, and the wise, and the true,
They are the friends we love!
Their beautiful lives are for me and for you,
They are the friends we love!

BLEST BE THE TIE THAT BINDS.

1.

Blest be the tie that binds
Our hearts in Christian love;
The fellowship of kindred minds
Is like to that above.

2.

Before our Father's throne,
We pour our ardent prayers;
Our fears, our hopes, our aims are one,
Our comforts and our cares.

3.

We share our mutual woes,
Our mutual burdens bear;
And often for each other flows
The sympathizing tear.

4.

When we asunder part,
It gives us inward pain;
But we shall still be joined in heart,
And hope to meet again.


[Page 91: Music and Lyrics]

AMERICA, THE BEAUTIFUL.

Katherine Lee Bates.       (Tune–"MATERNA.")       Samuel A. Ward.

1.

O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain.
America! America!
God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea.

2.

O beautiful for pilgrim feet
Whose stern impassioned stress
A thoroughfare for freedom beat
Across the wilderness.
America! America!
God mend thine ev'ry flaw,
Confirm thy soul in self-control,
Thy liberty in law.

3.

O beautiful for heroes proved
In liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved,
And mercy more than life.
America! America!
May God thy gold refine
Till all success be nobleness
And ev'ry gain divine.

4.

O beautiful for patriot dream
That sees beyond the years
Thine alabaster cities gleam
Undimmed by human tears.
America! America!
God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea.

My Faith Looks Up to Thee.

1.

My faith looks up to Thee,
Thou Lamb of Calvary;
Saviour divine;
Now hear me while I pray;
Take all my guilt away;
O let me from this day,
Be wholly Thine.

2.

May Thy rich grace impart
Strength to my fainting heart;
My zeal inspire;
As Thou hast died for me,
O, may my love to Thee
Pure, warm and changeless be–
A living fire.

3.

While life's dark maze I tread,
And griefs around me spread,
Be Thou my guide;
Bid darkness turn to day;
Wipe sorrow's tears away,
Nor let me ever stray
From Thee aside.

4.

When ends life's transient dream;
When death's cold sullen stream
Shall o'er me roll;
Blest Saviour, then in love
Fear and distrust remove;
O, bear me safe above,–
A ransomed soul.


[Page 92: Music and Lyrics]

LOVING KINDNESS.

1.

Awake, my soul, to joyful lays,
And sing thy great Redeemer's praise;
He justly claims a song from me,
His loving kindness, oh, how free!
Loving kindness, loving kindness,
His loving kindness, oh, how free!

2.

He saw me ruined in the fall,
Yet loved me, notwithstanding all;
He saved me from my lost estate,
His loving kindness, oh, how great!
Loving kindness, loving kindness,
His loving kindness, oh, how great!

3.

Tho' numerous hosts of might foes,
Tho' earth and hell my way oppose,
He safely leads my soul along,
His loving kindness, oh, how strong!
Loving kindness, loving kindness,
His loving kindness, oh, how strong!

4.

When trouble, like a gloomy cloud,
Has gathered thick and thundered loud,
He near my soul has always stood,
His loving kindness, oh, how good!
Loving kindness, loving kindness,
His loving kindness, oh, how good!

I THINK, WHEN I READ THAT SWEET STORY.

1.

I think, when I read that sweet story of old,
When Jesus was here among men,
How He called little children like lambs to His fold,
I should like to have been with Him then.

2.

I wish that His hands had been placed on my head,
That His arms had been thrown around me,
And that I might have seen His kind look when He said,
"Let the little ones come unto Me."

3.

Yet still to His footstool in prayer I may go,
And ask for a share in His love;
And if I thus earnestly seek Him below,
I shall see Him and hear Him above.


[Page 93: Music and Lyrics]

I THINK, WHEN I READ THAT SWEET STORY.–Con.

JESUS LOVES ME.

ANNA B. WARNER.                               WILLIAM B. BRADBURY.

1.

Jesus loves me! this I know,
For the Bible tells me so;
Little ones to Him belong;
They are weak, but He is strong.

REFRAIN:
Yes, Jesus loves me! Yes, Jesus loves me!
Yes, Jesus loves me! The Bible tells me so.

2.

Jesus loves me! He who died
Heaven's gates to open wide;
He will wash away my sin,
Let His little child come in.

3.

Jesus loves me! He will stay
Close beside me all the way;
If I love Him, when I die,
He will take me home on high.

Amen.


[Page 94: Music and Lyrics]

CHEER, BOYS, CHEER.

CHAS. MACKAY.                               H. RUSSELL.

1.

Cheer, boys, cheer, no more of idle sorrow,
Courage! true heats shall bear us on our way;
Hope points before and shows the bright to-morrow;
Let us forget the darkness of to-day;
So, farewell, England, much as we adore thee,
We'll dry the tears that we have shed before;
Why should we weep to sail in search of fortune?
So farewell, England! farewell for evermore.

D. C.–
Cheer, boys, cheer, for country, mother country,
Cheer, boys, cheer, the willing strong right hand,
Cheer, boys, cheer, there's wealth for honest labor,
Cheer, boys, cheer, for the new and happy land.


2.

Cheer boys, cheer, the steady breeze is blowing,
To float us freely o'er the ocean's breast;
The world shall follow in the track we're going,
The star of Empire glitters in the West;
Here we had toil and little to reward it,
But there shall plenty smile upon our pain;
And ours shall be the prairie and the forest,
And boundless meadows ripe, ripe with golden grain.


[Page 95: Music and Lyrics]

CHEER, BOYS, CHEER.–Con.

WHILE SHEPHERDS WATCHED THEIR FLOCKS.

1.

While shepherds watched their flocks by night,
All seated on the ground;
The angel of the Lord came down,
And glory shone around,
And glory shone around.

2.

"Fear not," said he,–for mighty dread
Had seized their troubled mind,
"Glad tidings of great joy I bring,
To you and all mankind,
To you and all mankind.

3.

"To you in David's town this day,
Is born of David's line,
The Savior, who is Christ, the Lord,
And this shall be the sign;
And this shall be the sign.

4.

"The heav'nly babe you there shall find
To human view displayed,
All meanly wrapped in swathing bands,
And in a manger laid,
And in a manger laid."

5.

Thus spake the Seraph–and forthwith
Appeared a shining throng
Of angels, praising God, who thus
Addressed their joyful song,
Addressed their joyful song:–

6.

"All glory be to God on high,
And to the earth be peace;
Good-will henceforth, from heav'n to men
Begin and never cease,
Begin and never cease!"


[Page 96: Music and Lyrics]

ALL TOGETHER.

1.

All together, all together,
Once, once again;
Hearts and voices light as ever,
Gladly join the welcome strain.
Friendship's link is still unbroken,
Bright as its chain,
Where the parting word was spoken,
Now in smiles we meet again.

CHORUS.
O could we ever
Dwell in social pleasure here,
No more to sever
From the friends we love so dear.

2.

While the absent we are greeting,
Let us forget,
In this hour of social meeting,
Ev'ry thought of past regret.
Since the present, full of gladness,
Bids us be gay,
Banish ev'ry cloud of sadness,
And be happy while we may.

3.

When the warning–we must sever–
Comes once again,
Yet in feeling true as ever,
Shall our faithful hearts remain.
Oft shall mem'ry breathing o'er us,
Sweet friendship's strain,
Bring this happy time before us,
Till we all shall meet again.

WE'RE ALL NODDIN'.

1.

We are all noddin', nid, nid, noddin',
We are all noddin', and dropping off to sleep.
To keep us awake we have all done our best,
But we're weary and heavy, so home to our rest.

2.

We are all noddin', nid, nid, noddin',
We are all noddin', and dropping off to sleep.
The hour it is late, we'll no longer delay,
But we'll take our hats and bonnets, and quickly away.

 

FLAG SALUTE

"I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the Republic for which it stands. One nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

 


[Page 97: Music and Lyrics]

CHRISTMAS TIME IS COME AGAIN.

1.

Christmas time is come again,
Christmas pleasures bringing;
Let us join our voices now,
And Christmas songs be singing.
Years ago, one starry night,
Thus the story's given,
Angel bands o'er Bethlehem's plains,
Sang the songs of heaven.

Chorus.
Glory be to God on high!
Peace, goodwill to mortals!
Christ the Lord is born to-night,
Heav'n throws wide its portals.

2.

Angels sang, let men reply,
And children join their voices;
Raise the chorus loud and high,
Earth and heav'n rejoices.
When we reach that happy place
Joyous praises bringing,
Then, before our Father's face,
We shall still be singing.


[Page 98: Music and Lyrics]

ROBIN REDBREAST.

Words by ALLINGHAM.
GERMAN AIR.

1.

Good-bye, good-bye to Summer,
For the Summer's nearly done,
For the Summer's nearly done;
The garden smiling faintly,
Cool breezes in the sun;
The thrushes now are silent,
Our swallows flown away,
But robin's here, in coat of brown,
And scarlet breast-knot gay.

Chorus.
O Robin, Robin Redbreast, O Robin, Robin dear,
O Robin sings so sweetly in the falling of the year.

2.

Bright yellow, red, and orange,
The leaves come down in hosts,
The leaves come down in hosts.
The trees are Indian princes,
But soon they'll turn to ghosts;
The leath'ry pears and apples
Hang russet on the bough;
'Tis Autumn, Autumn, Autumn, late,
'Twill soon be Winter now.

3.

The fireside for the cricket,
The wheatstack for the mouse,
The wheatstack for the mouse.
When trembling night-winds whistle
And moan all round the house;
The frosty ways, like iron,
The branches, plum'd with snow,
Alas! in Winter, dead and dark,
Where can poor Robin go?


[Page 99: Music and Lyrics]

SINGING IN THE RAIN.

Elizabeth Akers Allen.                               Franz Joseph Haydn.

1.

Where the elm-tree branches
By the rain are stirr'd,
Careless of the shower
Swings a little bird:
Clouds may frown and darken,
Drops may fall in vain,
Little heeds the warbler
Singing in the rain.
Dimmer fall the shadows,
Mistier grows the air,–
Still the black clouds gather,
Dark'ning here and there.

2.

From their heavy fringes,
Pour their drops amain;
Still the bird is singing,
Singing in the rain.
O thou hopeful singer,
Whom my faith perceives
To a dove transfigured,
Bringing olive leaves;
Olive leaves of promise,
Types of joy to be;
How in doubt and trial
Learns my heart of thee.

3.

Cheerful summer prophet!
List'ning to thy song,
How my fainting spirit
Groweth glad and strong,
Let the black clouds gather,
Let the sunshine wane,
If I may but join thee,
Singing in the rain.
Let the black clouds gather,
Let the sunshine wane,
If I may but join thee,
Singing in the rain.


[Page 100: Music and Lyrics]

OLD SANTA CLAUS.

JOHN READ.

1.

Old Santa Claus was all alone, a pipe upon his knee,
A funny look about his eyes for funny chap was he;
His queer old cap was twisted, torn, his wig was all awry;
He sat and mused, as lost in thought, while time went flying by.

CHORUS.
|: Santa Claus who fears no danger,
Over all the world a ranger,
Ev'rywhere a welcome stranger,
Speeds afar on Christmas eve! :|

2.

He had been busy as a bee, had stuffed his pack with toys;
Had gathered worlds of odds and ends, his gifts for girls an' boys,
Had dolls for girls, and whips for boys, with barrows, horses, drays,
Bureaus an' trunks for Dolly's clothes: all these his pack displays.

3.

Of candies too, or clear or striped, he had a bounteous store,
And raisins, figs, and prunes, and grapes, but wanted something more,
"I'm almost ready now," he said, "And Christmas nearly here;
But one thing more, I need a book for little folks this year."

4.

He clapped his specs upon his nose, picked up his rusty pen,
And wrote more lines in one short hour than you could write in ten;
Then Christmas eve and all in bed, Quick down the chimney flew,
And left, beside the stocking filled, the book he meant for you.


[Page 101: Music and Lyrics]

CHRISTMAS CAROL.

J. M. NEALE.
THOMAS HELMORE.

1.

Christ was born on Christmas day,
Wreathe the holly, twine the bay,
Light and life and joy is He,
The Babe, the Son, the Holy One of Mary.

2.

He is born to set us free;
He is born our Lord to be;
Carol, Christians, joyfully;
The God, the Lord, by all ador'd for ever.

3.

Let the bright red berries glow
Ev'rywhere in goodly show,
Light and life and joy is he,
The Babe, the Son, the Holy One of Mary.

Christian men, rejoice and sing;
'Tis the birthday of our King.
Carol, Christians, joyfully;
The God, the Lord, by all ador'd Forever.


Night of sadness, Morn of gladness,
Evermore. Ever, Ever,
After many troubles sore.
Morn of gladness evermore, and evermore.

Midnight scarcely passed and over,
Drawing to the holy morn,
Very early, Very early,
Christ was born.

Sing out with bliss, His name is this:
Emmanuel!
As 'twas foretold, In days of old,
By Gabriel.

Midnight scarcely passed and over,
Drawing to the holy morn,
Very early, Very early,
Christ was born.



[Page 102: Music and Lyrics]

A CHRISTMAS SONG.

Eleanor A. Hunter.                               "Duane Street"

1.

From ev'ry spire on Christmas Eve,
The Christmas bells ring clearly out
Their message of goodwill and peace,
With many a call and silver shout.
For faithful hearts, the angels' song
Still echoes in the frosty air,
And by the altar low they bow,
In adoration and in prayer.

2.

A thousand blessed mem'ries throng,
The stars are holy signs to them,
And from the eyes of ev'ry child
Looks forth the Babe of Bethlehem;
But there are others, not like these,
Whose brows are sad, whose hopes are cross'd,
To whom the season brings no cheer,
And life's most gracious charm is lost.

3.

To whom that story, old and sweet,
Is but a fable at the best,
The Christmas music mocks their ears,
And life has naught of joy or rest.
Oh! for angel's voice to pierce
The clouds of grief that o'er them rise,
The mists of doubt and unbelief
That veil the blue of Christmas skies.

4.

That they, at last, may see the light
Which shines from Bethl'hem, and unfold
For Christ the treasures of their hearts,
Richer than spicery or gold.
Hope of the ages, draw Thou near,
Till all the earth shall own Thy sway,
And when Thou reign'st in ev'ry heart
It will, indeed, be Christmas day.


[Page 103: Music and Lyrics]

MARCH OF THE MEN OF HARLECH.

WELSH PATRIOTIC SONG.

1.

Men of Harlech! honor calls us,
No proud Saxon e'er appalls us!
On we march! whate'er befalls us,
Never shall we fly!
Forward, lightly bounding,
To the trumpet's sounding;
Forward ever, backward ne'er,
The haughty foe astounding;
Fight for father, sister, mother,
Each is bound to each as brother;
And with faith in one another,
We will win or die!

2.

Tho' our mothers may be weeping,
Tho' our sisters may be keeping
Watch for some who now are sleeping
On the battlefield,
Still the trumpet's braying,
Sounds on, ever saying,
Let each bowman pierce a foe,
And never stop the slaying,
Till invaders learn to fear us,
And no Saxon linger near us;
Men of Wales! our God doth hear us,
Never will we yield!


[Page 104: Music and Lyrics]

CHRISTMAS SONG.

A. ADAM.
"CANTIQUE DE NOEL."

1.

Oh, solemn hour! when hearts were lowly bending,
And all the world seem'd enshrouded in night;
When pleading prayers to Heaven were ascending,
Above the gloom smiled a spirit of light.
'Twas Hope's bright form they saw so brightly shining
In robes unfading greet their tearful eyes
Beautiful Hope! no longer hearts repining,
As love and joy on wings of faith arise,
As love and joy on wings of faith arise.

2.

Oh, lovely hour! when light first faintly gleaming,
And hearts were fill'd with a rapture divine;
Led by the star whose rays were brightly beaming,
Came eastern sages round that holy shrine;
While there they saw the King of Glory sleeping,
Our Friend, Protector, in a manger laid,
Their hearts were glad, and sad eyes ceased their weeping,
For Faith was twining wreaths that never fade,
For Faith was twining wreaths that never fade.

3.

Oh, what delight! to hearts bowed down with sorrow,
When cheering words o'er our sad spirits fall;
Tho' dark the night; still comes a bright to-morrow,
When trusting hearts on their dear Saviour call;
Then let each voice in grateful notes ascending,
Extol His name, the bond, the slave, the free,
All shout His praise, in love and concord blending,
In songs of faith and immortality!
In songs of faith and immortality!


[Page 105: Music and Lyrics]

GRADUATION SONG.

GEORGE COOPER.                               ANCIENT MELODY.

1.

Our school-days now are past and gone,
And yet we fondly linger here;
For sweet each joy that we have known:
'Tis sad to part from comrades dear.
The world before us brightly lies,
Yet here fond mem'ry loves to dwell;
With saddened hearts and dewy eyes
We bid to all a sweet farewell!
Farewell! Farewell!
We bid to all a sweet farewell!

2.

Long will our hearts recall each joy
That bound us in sweet friendship here;
For time can nevermore destroy
The light of mem'ry burning clear.
Of other scenes and other cares
Our lips must new their story tell;
Each heart your tender mem'ry shares,
Teachers and comrades, now farewell!
Farewell! Farewell!
Teachers and comrades, now farewell!


[Page 106: Music and Lyrics]

ROBINSON CRUSOE.

AIR–"ROGUE'S MARCH"

1.

When I was a lad, I had cause to be sad,
A very good friend I did lose, O!
I warrant you, Dan, you have heard of this man,
His name it was Robinson Crusoe.

Chorus.
Oh, Robinson Crusoe! Oh, poor Robinson Crusoe!
He went off to sea, and between you and me,
Old Neptune wreck'd Robinson Crusoe.

2.

But he saved from aboard an old gun and a sword,
And another odd matter or two, so
That by dint of his thrift he just managed to shift,
And keep alive Robinson Crusoe.

Chorus.
Oh, Robinson Crusoe! Oh, poor Robinson Crusoe!
Whether tempest or Turk, or wild man or work,
No matter to Robinson Crusoe.

3.

His hut was a match for umbrella of thatch,
And his clothes were too old to be new, so
That his parrot at last would cry out as he passed,
"Hurrah for old Robinson Crusoe!"

Chorus.
Oh, Robinson Crusoe! Oh, poor Robinson Crusoe!
His parrot is dead and his goats have all fled
The home of old Robinson Crusoe.

4.

The cannibals came to his island one day,
To feast, for all cannibals do so,
But Friday, their man, jumped out of the pan,
And ran off to Robinson Crusoe.

Chorus.
Oh, Robinson Crusoe! Oh, poor Robinson Crusoe!
He fired off his gun, and then there was fun,
For lonely old Robinson Crusoe.

5.

But he never lost hope, and he never would mope,
And he always had faith, as should you, so
That come as it might, it always was right,
With honest old Robinson Crusoe.

Chorus.
Oh, Robinson Crusoe! Good old Robinson Crusoe!
Where can school-boy be found to stop at a round,
"Hurrah for old Robinson Crusoe!"

THE SNOW-BIRD.

REV. F. C. WOODWORTH.

1.

The ground was all covered with snow one day,
And two little children were busy at play,
When a snow-bird was sitting close by on a tree,
And merrily singing his chick-a-dee-dee;
Chick-a-dee-dee, chick-a-dee-dee,
And merrily singing his chick-a-dee-dee.

2.

He had not been singing that tune very long,
Ere Emily heard him, so loud was his song;
"O sister! look out of the window!" said she;
"Here's a dear little bird, singing chick-a-dee-dee.
Chick-a-dee-dee, chick-a-dee-dee,
Here's a dear little bird, singing chick-a-dee-dee."

3.

"Poor fellow! he walks in the snow and the sleet,
And has neither stockings nor shoes on his feet;
I pity him so! how cold he must be!
And yet he keeps singing his chick-a-dee-dee.

4.

"If I were a bare-footed snow-bird, I know
I would not stay out in the cold and the snow;
I wonder what makes him so full of his glee;
He's all the time singing that chick-a-dee-dee."

5.

The bird had flown down for some crumbs of bread,
And heard every word little Emily said;
"What a figure I'd make in that dress!" thought he,
And he laughed, as he warbled his chick-a-dee-dee.

6.

"I am grateful," said he, "for the wish you express,
But I've no occasion for such a fine dress;
I would rather remain with my limbs all so free,
Than to hobble about, singing chick-a-dee-dee."


[Page 107: Music and Lyrics]

THE SNOW-BIRD.–Con.

GONE ARE THE DAYS.

By G. L. C.                               Tune–Old Black Joe

1.

Gone are the days
When we were so fresh and green;
Gone are the days
When as Sophs so wise did seem;
Passed Junior heights,
That will know us now no more,
We hear the world oh sternly calling,
"O, Senior!"

Chorus.
We're coming, we're coming,
See how things come our way;
And all the world will soon
Pass under Senior sway.

2.

Now come the days
When we face the world so wide,
To do our best,
Then no matter what betide.
Still we do sigh
For the days that will come no more,
Although the call we answer gladly,
"O, Senior!"


[Page 108: Music and Lyrics]

WAKE! AND TUNE YOUR YOUTHFUL VOICES.

JOHN G. ROBINSON.                               FRANK TREAT SOUTHWICK.

1.

Wake! and tune your youthful voices,
'Tis the anniversary morn,
When all heav'n and earth rejoices,
Over Christ, our Saviour born.
Angels came from brightest glory
Singing carols of His birth,
And the shepherds spread the story,
"Peace, goodwill to men on earth!"

Wake! and tune your youthful voices,
'Tis the anniversary morn,
When all heav'n and earth rejoices,
Over Christ our Saviour born!

2.

Shout aloud your songs of gladness,
On this joyful Christmas morn,
Let no dismal ray of sadness
Dim the day when Christ was born!
Giving joy for ev'ry sorrow,
Peace to ev'ry troubled breast,
Pointing out a bright to-morrow
Where the weary all find rest.

Wake! and tune your youthful voices,
'Tis the anniversary morn,
When all heav'n and earth rejoices,
Over Christ our Saviour born!


[Page 109: Music and Lyrics]

REVOLUTIONARY TEA.

1.

There was an old lady lived over the sea,
And she was an Island Queen;
Her daughter lived off in a new countrie,
With an ocean of water between;
The old lady's pockets were full of gold,
But never contented was she,
So she called on her daughter to pay her a tax,
Of three pence a pound on her tea,
Of three pence a pound on her tea.

2.

"Now, mother, dear mother," the daughter replied,
"I sha'n't do the thing you ax;
I'm willing to pay a fair price for the tea,
But never the three penny tax;"
"You shall," quoth the mother, and redden'd with rage,
"For you're my own daughter, you see,
And sure, 'tis quite proper the daughter should pay
Her mother a tax on her tea,
Her mother a tax on her tea.

3.

And so the old lady her servant called up,
And packed off a budget of tea;
And eager for three pence a pound,
She put in enough for a large familie.
She order'd her servants to bring home the tax,
Declaring her child should obey,
Or old as she was, and almost woman grown,
She'd half whip her life away,
She'd half whip her life away.

4.

The tea was conveyed to the daughter's door,
All down by the ocean's side;
And the bouncing girl pour'd out every pound,
In the dark and boiling tide;
And then she called out to the Island Queen,
"Oh, mother, dear mother," quoth she,
"Your tea you may have when 'tis steep'd enough,
But never a tax from me,
But never a tax from me."


[Page 110: Music and Lyrics]

JOHN BROWN'S BODY.

CHARLES S. HALL.

1.

John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave,
John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave,
John Brown's body lies a-mould'ring in the grave,
His soul goes marching on!

Chorus
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His soul is marching on.

2.

The stars of heaven are looking kindly down,
The stars of heaven are looking kindly down,
The stars of heaven are looking kindly down,
On the grave of old John Brown!

3.

He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord,
He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord,
He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord!
His soul is marching on!

4.

John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back,
John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back,
John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back!
His soul is marching on!

SPEED AWAY.

1.

Speed away! speed away! on thine errand of light!
There's a young heart awaiting thy coming to-night;
She will fondle thee close, she will ask for the loved
Who pine upon earth since the "Day Star" has roved;
She will ask if we miss her, so long is her stay;
Speed away! Speed away! Speed away!

2.

And, oh! wilt thou tell her, blest bird on the wing,
That her mother hath ever a sad song to sing;
That she standeth alone, in the still quiet night,
And her fond heart goes forth for the being of light,
Who had slept in her bosom, but who would not stay?
Speed away! Speed away! Speed away!

3.

Go, bird of the silver wing, fetterless now,
Stop not thy bright pinions on yon mountain's brow;
But hie thee away, o'er rock, river and glen,
And find our young "Day Star" ere night close again;
Up! onward! let nothing thy mission delay;
Speed away! Speed away! Speed away!


[Page 111: Music and Lyrics]

SPEED AWAY.–Con.

FOLLOW ME, FULL OF GLEE.

Movement Song.

1.

Children go, to and fro,
In a merry, pretty row;
Footsteps light, faces bright;
'Tis a happy, happy sight;
Swiftly turning round and round,
Do not look upon the ground,
Follow me, full of glee,
Singing merrily.

CHORUS.
Singing merrily, merrily, merrily,
Singing merrily, merrily, merrily,
Follow me, full of glee,
Singing merrily.

2.

Birds are free, so are we,
And we live as happily;
Work we do, study, too,
Learning daily something new;
Then we laugh, and dance, and sing:
Gay as birds or anything.
Follow me, full of glee,
Singing merrily.

3.

Work is done, play's begun,
Now we have our laugh and fun;
Happy days, pretty plays,
And no naughty, naughty ways.
Holding fast each other's hand,
We're a happy, cheerful band;
Follow me, full of glee,
Singing merrily.


[Page 112: Music and Lyrics]

NOW THANK WE ALL OUR GOD.

MARTIN RINKART, 1644.

1.

Now thank we all our God, With heart and hands and voices,
Who wondrous things hath done, In whom His earth rejoices;
Who from our mothers' arms Hath blessed us on our way
With countless gifts of love, And still is ours to-day.

2.

O may this bounteous God, Through all our life, be near us,
With ever joyful hearts, And blessed peace to cheer us,
And keep us in His grace And guide us when perplexed,
And free us from all ills, In this world and the next.

3.

All praise and thanks to God, The Father, now be given,
The Son and Him Who reigns, With them in highest Heaven;
The one eternal God, Whom earth and Heaven adore;
For thus it was, is now, And shall be evermore.

THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL

W. R. WALLACE.                               B. COVERT.

1.

He lay upon his dying bed;
His eyes were growing dim,
When with a feeble voice he called
His weeping son to him:
"Weep not, my boy!" the vet'ran said,
"I bow to heav'ns high will–
But quickly from the antler bring
The sword of Bunker Hill;
But quickly from the antler bring
The sword of Bunker Hill."

2.

The sword was bro't, the soldier's eye
Lit with a sudden flame;
And as he grasped the ancient blade,
He murmured Warren's name;
Then said, "My boy, I leave you gold;
But what is richer still,
I leave you, mark me, mark me now,
The sword of Bunker Hill;
I leave you, mark me, mark me now,
The sword of Bunker Hill.

3.

"'Twas on that dread immortal day
I dared the Briton's hand;
A captain raised this blade on me,
I tore it from his hand;
And while the glorious battle raged,
It lightened freedom's will;
For, boy, the God of freedom blessed
The sword of Bunker Hill;
For, boy, the God of freedom blessed
The sword of Bunker Hill."

4.

"O keep the sword!"–his accents broke–
A smile, and he was dead,
His wrinkled hand still grasped the blade,
Upon that dying bed.
The son remains, the sword remains,
Its glory growing still;
And twenty millions bless the sire,
And sword of Bunker Hill;
And twenty millions bless the sire,
And sword of Bunker Hill.


[Page 113: Music and Lyrics]

THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL.–Con.

ANGRY WORDS.

CHILDHOOD SONG.

1.

Angry words the lightly spoken
In a rash and thoughtless hour;
Brightest links of life are broken
By their fell insidious power.
Hearts inspired by warmest feeling,
Ne'er before by anger stirred,
Oft are rent past human healing
By a single angry word.

2.

Poison drops of care and sorrow,
Bitter poison drops are they,
Weaving for the coming morrow
Saddest mem'ries of to-day.
Angry words! oh, let them never
From the tongue unguarded slip;
May the heart's best impulse ever
Check them ere they pass the lip.

3.

Love is much too pure and holy,
Friendship is too sacred far,
For a moment's reckless folly,
Thus to desolate and mar.
Angry words are lightly spoken,
Bitt'rest thoughts are rashly stirred;
Brightest links of life are broken
By a single angry word.


[Page 114: Music and Lyrics]

HOLY NIGHT.

Michael Haydn.

1.

Silent night! Holy night!
All is calm, all is bright.
Round yon virgin mother and Child!
Holy Infant, so tender and mild,
Sleep in heavenly peace,
Sleep in heavenly peace.

2.

Silent night! Holy night!
Shepherds quake at the sight!
Glories stream from Heaven afar,
Heav'nly hosts sing Alleluia;
Christ the Savior is born!
Christ the Savior is born!

3.

Silent night! Holy night!
Son of God, love's pure light
Radiant beams from Thy holy face,
With the dawn of redeeming grace.
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth,
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth.

ANOTHER FAVORITE VERSION.

Silent night! hallowed night!
Land and deep silent sleep!
Softly glitters bright Bethlehem's star,
Beckoning Israel's eye from afar,
Where the Saviour is born.

Silent night! hallowed night!
On the plain wakes the strain,
Sung by heavenly harbingers bright,
Fraught with tidings of boundless delight:
Christ the Saviour has come.

Silent night! hallowed night!
Earth awake, silence break;
High your anthems of melody raise,
Heaven and earth in full chorus of praise:
Peace forever shall reign.

THREE BLIND MICE. (Round.)

1 Three blind mice, Three blind mice,

2See how they run, See how they run!

They all 3 ran after the farmer's wife,
She cut off their tails with a carving knife;

Did 4 ever you see such a thing in your life,
As three blind mice?


[Page 115: Music and Lyrics]

RAISE YOUR HANDS.

1.

Raise your hands, if they are clean,
By your teacher to be seen;
Hands and faces, clean and bright,
How they will our hearts delight!
Raise them high, and turn them so;
Oh, they're almost white as snow!
Hold them very still again–
Teacher, don't you see each vein?

2.

Almost see the purple tide
All along our fingers glide;
Oh, how healthy we must be,
When the blood can flow so free!
Hid with dirt we should not know
There are pretty veins below;
All that gladly come to school,
All must learn the cleanly rule.

3.

Brush your clothes, and comb your hair,
Wash your face and hands with care;
Sparkle, sparkle, water pure,
Dirty hands we can't endure.
Washing's pleasant, we are sure;
Sparkle, sparkle, water pure;
Washing's pleasant, we are sure,
Sparkle, sparkle, water pure!

COLLEGE DAYS.

G. L. C.                               Grace Leal Crozier, '10.

 

CHORUS.
Oh college days! Dear college days!
May thy sweet mem'ries linger long,
Oh college days! Dear college days!
For thee we will be true and strong.

1.

Too soon we leave thy fost'ring love and care,
And with the world our joy and treasure share;
All due honor, all true fame,
We will owe to thy dear name.

2.

Our wise Profs. all have done their best,
To train our minds in Greek, math, and all the rest;
But some do shirk and some do cram,
But more still grind right thru till 'xam.

3.

The dear old campus with friendly shade,
The green ivied walls and classic halls so staid,
Verdant Freshies, society frays,
Will be remembered in those days.


[Page 116: Music and Lyrics]

COLLEGE DAYS.–Con.

FAIR HARVARD.

1.

Fair Harvard! thy sons to thy jubilee throng,
And with blessings surrender thee o'er,
By these festival rites, from the Age that is past,
To the Age that is waiting before.
O Relic and Type of our ancestors' worth,
That hast long kept their memory warm!
First flow'r of their wilderness! Star of their night,
Calm rising thro' change and thro' storm!

2.

To thy bowers we were led in the bloom of our youth,
From the home of our infantile years,
When our fathers had warned, and our mothers had prayed,
And our sisters had blest, through their tears.
Thou then wert our parent,–the nurse of our souls,–
We were moulded to manhood by thee,
Till freighted with treasure–tho'ts, friendships, and hopes,
Thou didst launch us on Destiny's sea.

3.

When, as pilgrims, we come to revisit thy halls,
To what kindlings the season gives birth!
Thy shades are more soothing, thy sunlight more dear,
Than descend on less privileged earth.
For the good and the great, in their beautiful prime,
Through thy precincts have musingly trod,
As they girded their spirits or deepened their streams
That make glad the fair city of God.

4.

Farewell! be thy destinies onward and bright!
To thy children the lesson still give,
With freedom to think, and with patience to bear,
And for Right ever bravely to live.
Let not moss-covered Error moor thee at its side,
As the world on Truth's current glides by:
Be the herald of Light, and the bearer of Love,
Till the stock of the Puritans die.


[Page 117: Music and Lyrics]

FAIR HARVARD.–Con.


[Page 118: Music and Lyrics]

LARGO.

THOMAS WILLIAMS.

Father in heav'n, Thy children hear,
As they adoring bow,
O Thou, Almighty One,
Hear Thou, our pray'r;
Strengthen our faith;
With hope inspire our hearts,
Flaming our souls with love
Like unto Thine.
Then shall Thy works abound,
Men shall proclaim that
God our Lord is God alone,
And holy, holy, is His name,
And holy is His name.
God our Lord is God alone,
And holy, holy, is His name,
God our Lord is God alone,
And holy, holy, is His name.


[Page 119: Music and Lyrics]

LARGO.–Con.


[Page 120: Music and Lyrics]

LARGO.–Con.

LEAD US, HEAVENLY FATHER, LEAD US.

Words by James Edmeston, 1821.

1.

Lead us, heavenly Father, lead us,
O'er the world's tempestuous sea;
Guard us, guide us, keep us, feed us,
For we have no help but Thee;
Yet possessing every blessing,
If our God our Father be.

2.

Spirit of our God, descending,
Fill our hearts with heavenly joy,
Love with ev'ry passion blending,
Pleasure that can never cloy;
Thus provided, pardoned, guided,
Nothing can our peace destroy.

Amen.


[Page 121: Music and Lyrics]

ILLINOIS.

Verses 1-4 by C. H. CHAMBERLAIN
Verses 5 & 6 from The School Weekly

1.

By thy rivers gently flowing, Illinois, Illinois,
O'er thy prairies verdant growing, Illinois, Illinois,
Comes an echo on the breeze.
Rustling thro' the leafy trees,
And its mellow tones are these, Illinois, Illinois,
And its mellow tones are these, Illinois.

2.

From a wilderness of prairies, Illinois, Illinois,
Straight thy way and never varies, Illinois, Illinois,
Till upon the inland sea,
Stands thy great commerical tree,
Turning all the world to thee, Illinois, Illinois,
Turning all the world to thee, Illinois.

3.

When you heard your country calling, Illinois, Illinois,
Where the shot and shell were falling, Illinois, Illinois,
When the "Southern Host" withdrew,
Pitting Gray against the Blue,
There were none more brave than you, Illinois, Illinois,
There were none more brave than you, Illinois.

4.

Not without thy wondrous story, Illinois, Illinois,
Can be writ the nation's glory, Illinois, Illinois,
On the record of thy years,
Ab'ram Lincoln's name appears,
Grant and Logan, and our tears, Illinois, Illinois,
Grant and Logan, and our tears, Illinois.

5.

When the Cubans struck for freedom, Illinois, Illinois,
Uncle Sam resolved to aid them, Illinois, Illinois,
And for men on land and sea,
Illinois said "Call on me!
For the Cubans must be free!" Illinois, Illinois,
For the Cubans must be free! Illinois.

6.

Some encamped at Chickamauga, Illinois, Illinois,
Others fell at Santiago, Illinois, Illinois,
Others anxious for a call,
They will march, or fight, or fall,
They are heroes, heroes all, Illinois, Illinois,
They are heroes, heroes all, Illinois.

Used by permission of Clayton F Summy Co., owners of the copyright.


[Page 122: Music and Lyrics]

CARRY ME BACK TO OLD VIRGINNY.

Words and music by James Bland.

1.

Carry me back to old Virginny,
There's where the cotton and the corn and tatoes grow,
There's where the birds warble sweet in the springtime,
There's where the old darkey's heart am long'd to go,
There's where I labored so hard for old Massa,
Day after day in the field of yellow corn,
No place on earth do I love more sincerely
Than old Virginny, the state where I was born.

CHORUS
Carry me back to old Virginny,
There's where the cotton and the corn and tatoes grow,
There's where the birds warble sweet in the springtime,
There's where this old darkey's heart has long'd to go.

2.

Carry me back to old Virginny,
There let me live till I wither and decay,
Long by the old Dismal Swamp have I wandered,
There's where this old darkey's life will pass away.
Massa and Missis have long gone before me,
Soon we will meet on that bright and golden shore,
There we'll be happy and free from all sorrow,
There's where we'll meet and we'll never part no more.

Copyright MCMVI by Oliver Ditson Company. Used by permission.


[Page 123: Music and Lyrics]

CARRY ME BACK TO OLD VIRGINNY.–Con.

GOD BLESS OUR NATIVE LAND.

T. DWIGHT.

1.

God bless our native land!
Firm may she ever stand,
Through storm and night;
When the wild tempests rave,
Ruler of wind and wave,
Do Thou our country save
By Thy great might!

2.

For her our pray'rs shall rise
To God above the skies,
On him we wait;
Thou who art ever nigh,
Guarding with watchful eye,
To Thee aloud we cry,
God save the State!


[Page 124: Music and Lyrics]

YEARS OF PEACE.

Sicilian Air.

Years are coming, speed them onward!
When the sword shall gather rust,
And the helmet, lance and falchion,
Sleep at last in silent dust!

Earth has heard too long of battle,
Heard the trumpet's voice too long,
But another age advances,
Seers foretold in ancient song.

Years are coming when forever,
War's dread banner shall be furled,
And the angel, Peace, be welcomed,
Regent of the happy world.

PRAISE FOR PEACE.

Words by
ANGUS S. HIBBARD.

Composed in 1810 by
FRIEDRICH F. FLEMMING.
(1778-1813)

1.

Father in Heaven, in Thy love abounding,
Hear these Thy children thro' the world resounding,
Loud in Thy praises thanks for peace abiding,
Ever abiding.

2.

Filled be our hearts with peace beyond comparing,
Peace in Thy world, joy to all heart's despairing,
Firm is our trust in Thee for peace enduring,
Ever enduring.

3.

God of our Fathers, strengthen ev'ry nation,
In Thy great peace where only is salvation,
So may the world its future spread before Thee,
Thus to adore Thee.


[Page 125: Music and Lyrics]

PRAISE FOR PEACE.–Con.

O, COME, COME AWAY.

1.

O come, come away,
From labor now reposing,
Let busy care, awhile forbear,
O come, come away.

Come, come, our social joys renew,
And thus where trust and friendship grew,
Let true hearts welcome you,
O come, come away.

2.

From toils, and the cares
On which the day is closing,
The hour of eve brings sweet reprieve,
O come, come away.

Oh come where love will smile on thee,
And round its hearth will gladness be,
And time fly merrily,
Oh come, come away.


[Page 126: Music and Lyrics]

WHEN JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME.

Louis Lambert.

1.

When Johnny comes marching home again,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
We'll give him a hearty welcome then,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
The men will cheer, the boys will shout,
The ladies they will all turn out,
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.

2.

The old church bell will peal with joy,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
To welcome home our darling boy,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
The village lads and lassies say,
With roses they will strew the way,
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.

3.

Get ready for the jubilee,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
We'll give the hero three times three,
Hurrah, Hurrah!
The laurel wreath is ready now
To place upon his loyal brow;
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.


Bingo Was His Name.

Johnny had a little dog,
And Bingo was his name, sir,
B-i-n-g-o go,
B-i-n-g-o go,
B-i-n-g-o go,
Bingo was his name, sir.


[Page 127: Music and Lyrics]

KILLARNEY.

M. M. Balfe's Last [missing].

1.

By Killarney's lakes and fells,
Em'rald isles and winding bays,
Mountain paths and woodland dells,
Mem'ry ever fondly strays.
Bounteous nature loves all lands
Beauty wonders ev'rywhere;
Footprints leaves on many strands,
But her home is surely there!
Angels fold their wings and rest,
In that Eden of the west
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.

2.

Innisfallen's ruined shrine
May suggest a passing sigh;
But man's faith can ne'er decline
Such God wonders floating by;
Castle Lough and Glena bay,
Mountains Tore and Eagle's Nest,
Still at Mucross you must pray,
Tho' the monks are now at rest.
Angels wonder not that man
There would fain prolong life's span
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.

3.

No place else can charm the eye,
With such bright and varied tints,
Ev'ry rock that you pass by,
Verdure broiders or besprints.
Virgin there the green grass grows,
Ev'ry morn spring's natal day;
Bright-hued berries daff the snows,
Smiling winter's frown away.
Angels often pausing there,
Doubt if Eden were more fair,
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.

4.

Music there for echo dwells,
Makes each sound a harmony,
Many-voic'd the chorus swells
'Till it faints in ecstasy.
With the charmful tints below,
Seems the heav'n above to vie,
All rich colors that we know,
Tinge the cloud-wreaths in that sky.
Wings of angels so might shine
Glancing back soft light divine,
Beauty's home, Killarney,
Ever fair Killarney.


[Page 128: Music and Lyrics]

MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA.

H. C. W.                               H. C. Work.

1.

Bring the good old bugle, boys! we'll sing another song–
Sing it with a spirit that will start the world along–
Sing it as we used to sing it, fifty thousand strong,
While we were marching thro' Georgia.

CHORUS.
Hurrah! hurrah! we bring the jubilee!
Hurrah! hurrah! The flag that makes you free!
D. S.–So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea,
While we were marching thro' Georgia.


2.

How the darkies shouted when they heard the joyful sound!
How the turkeys gobbled which our commissary found!
How the sweet potatoes even started from the ground,
While we were marching thro' Georgia.

3.

Yes, and there were Union men who wept with joyful tears,
When they saw the honored flag they had not seen for years;
Hardly could they be restrained from breaking forth in cheers,
While we were marching though Georgia.

4.

"Sherman's dashing Yankee boys will never reach the coast!"
So the saucy rebels said, and 'twas a handsome boast;
Had they not forgot, alas, to reckon with the host,
While we were marching thro' Georgia.

5.

So we made a thoroughfare for freedom and her train,
Sixty miles in latitude–three hundred to the main;
Treason fled before us, for resistance was in vain,
While we were marching thro' Georgia.

THE CUCKOO.

1.

Cuckoo, cuckoo, welcome thy song!
Cuckoo, cuckoo, welcome thy song;
Winter is going,
Soft breezes blowing,
Spring-time, spring-time, soon will be here.

2.

Cuckoo, cuckoo, warble away,
Cuckoo, cuckoo, warble away;
Bring the sweet flowers,
Sunshine and showers,
Spring-time, spring-time, do not delay.

3.

Cuckoo, cuckoo, cease not thy song,
Cuckoo, cuckoo, cease not thy song;
Where thou are roaming,
Bright days are coming,
Spring-time, spring-time, hasten along.


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