A Celebration of Women Writers

"Sweden." by Thorburg Rappe.
Publication: Elliott, Maud Howe, ed. (1854-1948) Art and Handicraft in the Woman's Building of the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. Chicago and New York: Rand, McNally & Company, 1894. pp. 299-304.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom


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ALTAR PIECE–
ROMANESQUE STYLE.
DESIGNED BY A. BRANTING; "FRIENDS OF HANDIWORK."
SWEDEN.

SWEDEN.

THE love of knowledge is a distinguishing feature in the character of Swedes.

The Swedish woman has not manifested less love of knowledge than is attributed to her nation.

A certain amount of school education has for centuries been considered necessary to woman, and, especially in the middle of this century, claims arose for a higher standard in her education. The royal academies of music and fine arts, the training schools for sloid and gymnastics were opened to women, and they have the same rights as men for studying at the universities.

As teachers, principals of schools, members of school boards, lady inspectors, authors in pedagogics, etc., women have attained an influence which is steadily increasing.

The endeavors to raise the standard of manual work has called forth the efforts of many Swedish women. Misses Eva Rodhe and Hulda Lundin have developed the excellent systems of sloid. The


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PAINTED SCREEN–
IMITATION GOBELIN.
ANNA BOBERG.
SWEDEN.

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LINEN CHATTADUK WALL HANGING.
MME. CILLUF ALSSON, SCANIA.
SWEDEN.
latter exhibits a series of models in the Swedish section of the Woman's Building, where is also to be seen a very fine collection of fancy works from the Society of Art Handiwork, and from Misses Giobel, Kulle, Zickerman, Ahrberg, Randel, Ingelotz, and others.

This society has in a high degree refined the taste and raised the standard of woman's industrial work. It has adapted old designs and encouraged the original Swedish lace-work, tapestry, and weaving, and by doing so has preserved for the country a national industrial art which might otherwise have been entirely lost.


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TAPESTRY.
BENGKA OLSSON.
SWEDEN.

We find in this section some fine etched glass by Mrs. Petterson, and a cistern in embossed copper by Mrs. Juel.

An interesting medal exhibit is given by Lea Ahlborn, who is connected with the royal mint, and designs medals for the government.


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LARGE GOBLET OF ETCHED GLASS.
HILDA PETTERSON.
SWEDEN.

The portrait of the Queen of Sweden and Norway, patroness of the Swedish Ladies Committee to the World's Columbian Exposition, hangs on the wall of the booth, and is surrounded by tapestries.

In the library of the building are 130 volumes by the most eminent authors, from which we cite the names of Sta Briggita, Fredrika Bremer, Leffler-Caianello, Benedictson, Olivecrona, Adlersparre, Roos, and others.

Several portraits have been hung in Assembly Hall. Among them are pictures of Jenny Lind, Christine Nilsson, Fredrika Bremer, and Sta Briggita.

A stand holds music written by Mrs. Netzel, Misses Aulin, Andrée, and Munktell.

A beautiful portfolio and an album in embossed leather, by Miss Gisberg, incloses photographs and biographies of eminent musicians and authors of the present time.

A large number of ladies have studied at the Academy of Fine Arts, and many female names have been prominent among the painters of the last decades.

Among the exhibitors in the Swedish Section of Fine Arts, we find Mrs. Pauli, Mrs. Chadwick, Misses Bonnier, Schultzenheim, Keyser, and Jolin, and in the Swedish pavilion, water-colors by Miss Anna Palm.

As we have tried to show by the above, the Swedish woman takes a great interest and an active part in the great works of culture, and it was, therefore, with much pleasure she received the invitation from her American sister, the most accomplished woman of our time, to take part in the Columbian Exposition.

THORBORG RAPEE.

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Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

This chapter has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the
Celebration of Women Writers.
Initial text entry and proof-reading of this chapter were the work of volunteer
Mary Mark Ockerbloom.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom