A Celebration of Women Writers

"Denmark." by Madame D'Oxholm.
Publication: Elliott, Maud Howe, ed. (1854-1948) Art and Handicraft in the Woman's Building of the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. Chicago and New York: Rand, McNally & Company, 1894. pp. 305-308.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom


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COSTUME OF A "HEDEBIPOGE"–
PEASANT WOMAN OF ZEELAND.
DENMARK.

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CUSHION AND WORKCASE.
Formerly Given by a Lover to His Betrothed; from the Island of Amager.
EXHIBITED BY MME. HOLMBLAD, NEE SCHACK. DENMARK.

DENMARK.

LAND of the North, of short somber days and long gloomy nights! If during half the year nature seems to chastise your people with one hand, she blesses them with the other.

The long winter evenings must perforce be spent at the fireside; thus a love of home is developed, and with it a cultivation of those homely gifts which transform the cottage hearth into a school of domestic art.


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OIL PAINTING–FLOWERS.
BY QUEEN LOUISE OF DENMARK, NEE PRINCESS OF HESSE.
DENMARK.

From time immemorial the peasants have gathered around their firesides in the long winter evenings, the men carving wood or mending their nets, the women busy with their looms and embroidery, while the village story-teller recites tales of war, of love, and of chivalry. In the National Museum at Copenhagen and in many Danish houses we find mementos of those evenings


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OLD SILK PETTICOAT.
In the Possession of the d'Arenstorff Family for Two Hundred Years
EXHIBITED BY MME. VALLO, NEE D'ARENSTORFF. DENMARK.
of long ago. In making a selection for the exhibit of work to be sent to the Woman's Building at Chicago, it has been thought best to give, as it were, a retrospective glance at the work of the Danish women in the past, as their modern industries are fully represented by Denmark's general exhibit.

The most ancient article in the collection is a superb petticoat, embroidered by hand, belonging to Madame Wallo, nee d'Arenstorff, which has been in her family since the seventeenth century. A baptismal robe is remarkable for the daintiness of the stitchery; the baby doll, in state swaddling-clothes, and the bridal veil are


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CARVED WOOD FRAME.
MLLE. HAWKINS.
DENMARK.
worthy of notice. The heavy brocades, embroidered linen, and peasant costumes are all characteristic and interesting. One rare and beautiful piece of work, a sewing cushion, has a certain romantic interest; it is the gift of a lover to his betrothed, and signifies that the time to prepare the trousseau has come.

The vinaigrettes and antique perfumery bottles exhibited are remarkable for the number and variety of their designs.

The fichus in silk embroidery of H. R. H. the princess royal form the beautiful head-dress and mantle of the costume worn by the peasants on the Island of L'Amerger.

A crowning interest in the exhibit is found in the painting of roses and lilies by Her Majesty Queen Louise; artistic embroidery and illuminated parchment by the princess royal of Denmark; three water-colors by Her Royal Highness Princess Woldersov, and the exquisite ebony frame designed and executed by Miss Hawkins in the highest style of workmanship.

MME. D'OXHOLM.

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Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

This chapter has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the
Celebration of Women Writers.
Initial text entry and proof-reading of this chapter were the work of volunteer
Mary Mark Ockerbloom.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom