A Celebration of Women Writers

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[Frontispiece]


Juniper Hall

[Title Page]

JUNIPER HALL

A RENDEZVOUS OF CERTAIN
ILLUSTRIOUS PERSONAGES
DURING THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
INCLUDING
ALEXANDRE D'ARBLAY
AND
FANNY BURNEY




CONSTANCE HILL


ILLUSTRATIONS BY
ELLEN G. HILL
AND REPRODUCTIONS IN PHOTOGRAVURE, ETC.


JOHN LANE - THE BODLEY HEAD
LONDON & NEW YORK - MDCCCCIV

[Page]

Printed by BALLANTYNE, HANSON & CO.
London & Edinburgh

[Page v]

PREFACE

IN a beautiful part of Surrey there stands a house famous as the resort of some distinguished French émigrés, who, during the Reign of Terror, had escaped from the guillotine.

This house, known as "Juniper Hall," is situated between the village of Mickleham and Burfordbridge. Within its walls there met together, a little more than a century ago, a group of singularly interesting persons, both French and English.

The French colony consisted of leading members of the Constitutional party, who had made great personal sacrifices in the cause of reform, and who had now suddenly fallen from power with the fall of their king; while among their English neighbours were the relatives of our authoress, Fanny Burney, and after a while Fanny Burney herself.

The letters of Miss Burney and of her sister, Mrs. Phillips, written during this period, reproduce the charming conversation and polished manners of this French "salon" on English soil, whose members, it has been remarked, [Page vi]  united "toute la vigueur de la liberté et toute la grâce de la politesse ancienne."

Out of this intercourse of French and English the love-affair between Fanny Burney and M. d'Arblay arose, which, resulting as it did in their marriage, gives a special interest to the émigrés' sojourn in Mickleham.

By the kindness of members of the Burney family and others valuable original matter has been put into our hands, including unpublished letters by Fanny, and by her father, Dr. Burney, by Edmund Burke, Arthur Young, and other persons. Permission has also been given for the reproduction of interesting portraits and of contemporary sketches.

The literary reader will of necessity remark sundry lapses in grammar in the letters of Fanny Burney - which are surprising as coming from an authoress of her experience. But the freshness and spontaneity of her letters shine, perhaps, all the brighter from our feeling that nothing has been changed or corrected by an after-thought.

The portrait of Fanny Burney, given in this book, is now published for the first time. It is reproduced from the picture in the possession of Colonel Burney, which he inherited from his grandfather, Richard Allen Burney, who was a nephew and contemporary of the authoress. It is one of two portraits painted by Fanny's cousin, [Page vii]  Edward Burney; the other being the well-known portrait prefixed to the "Diary and Letters."

The portrait of M. d'Arblay is a reproduction of the original crayon drawing now in the possession of Mr. Leverton Harris, M. P., of "Camilla Lacey," to whose kindness we also owe the permission to make use of other objects of interest in the Burney-parlour.

The portrait of Mr. Lock, of Norbury Park, is reproduced from a pencil drawing made by Edward Burney from the original portrait in oils by Sir Thomas Lawrence. This drawing is in all probability the sketch that used to hang on the walls of the cottage at Bookham, and which is spoken of by Madame d'Arblay as "dearest Mr. Lock, our founder's portrait."

To Lord Wallscourt, the great-grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Lock, we are indebted for permission to reproduce the beautiful portrait of Mrs. Lock, by Downman.

The picture of Juniper Hall is engraved from a watercolour drawing, by Dibdin, in the possession of Dr. Symes Thompson. It was taken many years before the house underwent any alteration.

The best portraits of the émigrés have been sought out by us in Paris, Versailles, and elsewhere, and we have obtained contemporary prints of the prison of the Abbaye and of the Place de Grève, scenes connected with their imprisonment [Page viii]  or escape; while in the neighbourhood of Mickleham numerous sketches have been made of places where their intercourse with the Burney family and others took place.

Among the books from which material has chiefly been drawn are the "Diary and Letters of Madame d'Arblay," edited by her niece; the "Memoir of Dr. Burney," by Madame d'Arblay; the "Memoires de Malouet," and, for its autobiographical portions, Madame de Staël's "Considérations sur les principaux Evénémens de la Revolution Française."

We should like to take this opportunity of thanking all who have assisted in the production of this book; whether by allowing us to visit their interesting houses or providing us with fresh material and portraits. Among them we would especially mention the name of Archdeacon Burney, a grand-nephew of the authoress, whose important collection has been generously put at our disposal.

The subject of this work has been found by the writer to be interesting and inspiring to a high degree. It is hoped that the reader may find it so also.

CONSTANCE HILL.

GROVE COTTAGE, FROGNAL
    HAMPSTEAD,
         October 1903.


[Page ix]

CONTENTS

CHAP.  PAGE
I.A PASTORAL PRELUDE1
II.A KING AND HIS PEOPLE5
III.THE BURSTING OF A STORM15
IV.FUGITIVES26
V.A HAVEN OF REFUGE37
VI.AN ENGLISH WELCOME52
VII."JUNIPÈRE"70
VIII.THE AUTHORESS OF "EVELINA"79
IX.A KING'S DEFENCE88
X.AN EVENING AT NORBURY PARK96
XI.A KING'S DEATH108
XII.A FRENCH LADY OF LETTERS114
XIII.A CYNICAL CRITIC127
XIV.A GROWING ATTACHMENT134
XV."DADDY CRISP'S" HOME146
XVI.A PERPLEXING QUESTION157
XVII.A MARRIAGE165
XVIII.A "TERRIBLE COUP"176
XIX.THE BOOKHAMITE RECLUSES189
XX.A GLIMPSE OF THE GAY WORLD198
XXI.THE "GRAND OUVRAGE"205
XXII.ON THE TERRACE AT WINDSOR213
XXIII.THE NEW HOME222
XXIV.VISITORS AT CAMILLA COTTAGE234
XXV.A ROYAL GUEST IN MICKLEHAM247
XXVI.FAREWELL260
 Index263

[Page xi]

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
Juniper Hall (From a water-colour drawing by Dibdin, taken in 1844)Frontispiece
River Mole2
Ruined Chapel4
Cypher used by Marie AntoinetteTo face 12
Old balcony, with the Fleur-de-lis, Quai Bourbon, Paris14
Portrait of Victor Pierre MalouetTo face 16
Doorway in the Rue du Bac (Adapted from a French drawing)19
Portrait of Lally-Tollendal (his flight from Paris below)To face 22
Prison of the Abbaye (Old Print)To face 24
Hôtel de Ville and Place de Grève (Old Print)To face 28
Dover Cliffs36
The Cottage at West-Humble38
A Room in the Cottage40
Portrait of Arthur YoungTo face 42
Portrait of the Duc de LiancourtTo face 44
Portrait of Alexandre, G. P. d'Arblay (From the original crayon drawing in the possession of F. Leverton Harris, Esq., M.P.)To face 54
The Sculptured Drawing-room at Juniper Hall57
The Home of Captain and Mrs. Phillips 61
Mrs. Phillips' Drawing-room64
Portrait of Mr. Lock of Norbury Park (From a drawing by Edward Burney, after the painting by Sir Thomas Lawrence)To face 66
Old Houses on the Seine69
Norbury Park from the Valley71
Portrait of Louis Lara, Comte de NarbonneTo face 74
A French Château78
Portrait of Fanny Burney (From a painting by Edward Burney, in the possession of Colonel Burney)To face 80
The "Whitestone" on Hampstead Heath87
The Picture-room, Norbury Park97
Portrait of Mrs. Lock (From a drawing by Downman, in the possession of the Lord Wallscourt)To face 100
The Hall, Norbury Park103
Portrait of the Abbé EdgeworthTo face 110
Box Hill from the Valley117
Portrait of Madame de Staël (From a painting by F. Reyberg)To face 118
Portrait of Monsieur de TalleyrandTo face 130
Norbury Park (Entrance side) (Old print)To face 138
Old Conservatory, Norbury Park140
"The Running Horse"143
The "Druids' Walk," Norbury Park145
Chesington Hall. (Front a drawing in the possession of Archdeacon Burney)147
Mulberry Tree in the Garden of Chesington Hall150
The "Mount" and Summer-house152
Window of the "Conjuring Closet" in Chesington Hall156
Carved Stone Seat, Norbury Park161
Portrait of Charles Burney. (After Sir Thomas Lawrence)To face 162
Chimney-piece decoration in Juniper Hall164
Mickleham Church in the Eighteenth Century166
Facsimile of the Entry in Mickleham Church Books of the Marriage of Alexandre d'Arblay and Frances BurneyTo face 166
Norman Doorway of Mickleham Church167
Chapel of the Sardinian Ambassador, Lincoln's Inn Fields169
Chimney-piece Ornament in Juniper Hall175
Portrait of Edmund Burke (By Romney)To face 182
Title-page of Madame d'Arblay's Appeal on Behalf of the French Emigrant Clergy184
The Cottage at Bookham190
Interior of the Cottage192
Box Hedges at Mickleham197
Portrait of Mrs. (afterwards Lady) CreweTo face 202
A Baby's Pincushion204
Old Cottages near Mickleham207
Title-page of "Camilla"211
The Terrace at Windsor in the Eighteenth Century212
The "Friseur"214
Portrait of Edward Burney (By himself)To face 224
Camilla Cottage (From and old sketch in the possession of F. Leverton Harris, Esq., M.P.)230
Chimney-piece Ornament in Juniper Hall233
Facsimile of Autograph Letter from Madame d'Arblay to her brother CharlesTo face 238
Passage in Camilla Cottage239
The Unaltered Room in Camilla Cottage244
General d'Arblay's "Hillock"245
Juniper Hill253
Medallion. A Mural Decoration in Juniper Hall, and also in Norbury Park (Subject unknown)262

The scroll upon the binding of this book is copied from a marble chimney-piece in Juniper Hall.


Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

This book has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the Celebration of Women Writers by John Phelan.

The start of each page of the print edition has been indicated in the on-line edition by the notation [Page x]. Where it is possible to see a larger scanned image of an illustration, a link to the [Full Image] of the illustration follows the in-line image. Links from the page numbers in the List of Illustrations go to the page anchor for the page, in the relevant chapter, where the relevant in-line image is displayed. Links from the illustration descriptions in the List of Illustrations go to the file for the full image, if there is one, or else the in-line image. In the original text, some of the illustrations appeared with captions while others did not. For this on-line edition, if the illustration did not appear with a caption in the original edition, the caption from the List of Illustrations has been added in square brackets after the illustration. Footnote markers from the original text (e.g. *) have been replaced by superscripted footnote numbers within square brackets. At the end of each chapter, a link to the [Next] chapter is given. Any other notations within square brackets are part of the original text.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom