This online edition is dedicated to
Juana Smith,
whose charm and grace shine throughout her husband's memoirs.

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF
LIEUTENANT-GENERAL

SIR HARRY SMITH
BART, G.C.B.


FIRST EDITION (2 vols.) December, 1901.
Reprinted January, 1902.
Reprinted February, 1902.
Reprinted April, 1902.
ONE VOL. EDITION September, 1902.


[Full Size]


[Title Page]

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF
LIEUTENANT-GENERAL

SIR HARRY SMITH
BARONET OF ALIWAL ON THE SUTLEJ
G.C.B.

EDITED
WITH THE ADDITION OF SOME SUPPLEMENTARY CHAPTERS
BY G. C. MOORE SMITH, M.A.

WITH PORTRAITS AND ILLUSTRATIONS

LONDON
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET
1903


PRINTED BY
WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
LONDON AND BECCLES.


PREFACE.

THE Life of Sir Harry Smith here offered to the public consists of an Autobiography covering the period 1787 to 1846 (illustrated by notes and appendices), and some supplementary chapters contributed by myself on the last period of Sir Harry's life (1846-1860). Chapter XXXI. carries the reader to the year 1829. This, it is interesting to remark, is a true turning point in the life of the great soldier. Till then he had seen warfare only on two continents, Europe and American (the Peninsula, France, the Netherlands, Monte Video, Buenos Ayres, Washington, New Orleans); from that date onwards the scene of his active service was Africa and Asia. Till 1829 his responsibility was small; after 1829 he had a large or paramount share in directing the operations in which he was engaged. This difference naturally affects the tone of his narrative in the two periods.

The Autobiography (called by its author "Various Anecdotes and Events of my Life") was begun by Sir Harry Smith, then Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, at Glasgow in 1824. At that time it was only continued as far as page 15 of the present volume. On 11th August, 1844, when he had won his K.C.B., and was Adjutant-General of Her Majesty's Forces in India, he resumed his task at Simla. He then wrote with such speed that on 15th October he was able to tell his sister that he had carried his narrative to the end of the campaign of Gwalior, that is, to 1844 (p. 490). Finally, on 7th September, 1846, when at Cawnpore in command of a Division, he began to add to what he had previously written an account of the campaign of the Sutlej, which had brought him fresh honours. This narrative was broken off abruptly in the middle of the Battle of Sobraon (p. 550), and was never completed. Accordingly, of Sir Harry Smith's life from February, 1846, to his death on 12th October, 1860, we have no record by his own hand.

The Autobiography had been carefully preserved by Sir Harry's former aide-de-camp and friend, General Sir Edward Alan Holdich, K.C.B., but, as it happened, I was not myself aware of its existence until, owing to the fresh interest awakened in Sir Harry Smith and his wife by the siege of Ladysmith early in 1900, I inquired from members of my family what memorials of my great-uncle were preserved. Sir Edward then put this manuscript and a number of letters and documents at my disposal. It appeared to me and to friends whom I consulted that the Autobiography was so full of romantic adventure and at the same time of such solid historical value that it ought no longer to remain unpublished, and Mr. John Murray, to whom I submitted a transcription of it, came at once to the same conclusion.

My task as Editor has not been a light one. In Sir Harry's letter to Mrs. Sargant of 15th October, 1844,1 he says of his manuscript, "I have never read a page of it since my scrawling it over at full gallop;" and in a letter of 14th January, 1845, "Harry Lorrequer would make a good story of it. You may ask him if you like, and let me know what he says of it." It is clear from these passages that Sir Harry did not contemplate the publication of his story in the rough form in which he had written it, but imagined that some literary man, such as Charles Lever, might take it in hand, rewrite it with fictitious names, and so fashion out of it a military romance. The chapters 2 on Afghanistan and Gwalior, already written, were, however, of a serious character which would make them unsuitable for such treatment; and the same was the case with the chapters on the Sikh War, afterwards added. Whether Lever ever saw the manuscript I do not know; at any rate, the author's idea was never carried out.

It is obvious that now that fifty years have passed, some of the reasons which made Sir Harry suggest such a transformation of his story are no longer in force. The actors in the events which he describes having almost all passed away, to suppress names would be meaningless and would deprive the book of the greater part of its interest. And for the sake of literary effect to rewrite Sir Harry's story would be to destroy its great charm, the intimate relation in which it sets us with his fiery and romantic character.

The book here given to the public is not indeed word for word as Sir Harry wrote it. It has often been necessary to break up a long sentence, to invert a construction–sometimes to transpose a paragraph in order to bring it into closer connexion with the events to which it refers. But such changes have only been made when they seemed necessary to bring out more clearly the writer's intention; the words are the author's own, even where a specially awkward construction has been smoothed; and it may be broadly said that nothing has been added to Sir Harry's narrative or omitted from it. Such slight additions to the text as seemed desirable, for example, names and dates of battles,3 have been included in square brackets. In some cases, to avoid awkward parentheses, sentences of Sir Harry's own have been relegated from the text to footnotes. Such notes are indicated by the addition of his initials ("H. G. S.").

Sir Harry's handwriting was not of the most legible order, as he admits, and I have had considerable difficulty in identifying some of the persons and places he mentions. Sometimes I have come to the conclusion that his own recollection was at fault, and in this case I have laid my difficulty before the reader.

I have not thought it my duty to normalize the spelling of proper names, such as those of towns in the Peninsula and in India, and the names of Kafir chiefs. Sir Harry himself spells such names in a variety of ways, and I have not thought absolute consistency a matter of importance, while to have re-written Indian names according to the modern official spelling would have been, as it seems to me, to perpetrate an anachronism.

I have, indeed, generally printed "Sutlej," though Sir Harry frequently or generally wrote "Sutledge;" but I have kept in his own narrative his spelling "Ferozeshuhur" (which is, I believe, more correct) for the battle generally called "Ferozeshah." Even Sir Harry's native place (and my own) has two spellings, "Whittlesey" and "Whittlesea." In his narrative I have preserved his usual spelling "Whittlesea," but I have myself used the other, as I have been taught to do from a boy.

Perhaps it is worth while to mention here that Sir Harry's name was strictly "Henry George Wakelyn Smith," and it appears in this form in official documents. But having been always known in the army as "Harry Smith," after attaining his knighthood he stoutly refused to become "Sir Henry," and insisted on retaining the more familiar name. 4 As the year of his birth is constantly given as 1788, it is worth while to state that the Baptismal Register of St. Mary's, Whittlesey, proves him to have been born on 28th June, 1787.

While the documents put into my hands by Sir Edward Holdich enabled me to throw a good deal of additional light on the events recorded in the Autobiography, I thought it a prime duty not to interrupt Sir Harry's own narrative by interpolations. Accordingly I have thrown this illustrative matter into Appendices. In some of these, especially in his letters to his wife of 1835 (Appendix iv.), one sees the writer, perhaps, in still more familiar guise than in the Autobiography.

But I had not merely to illustrate the period of Sir Harry's life covered by his Autobiography; I had a further task before me, viz. to construct a narrative of the rest of his life (1846-1860), including his Governorship of the Cape (1847-1852). For the manner in which I have done this, I must crave indulgence. At the best it would have been no easy matter to continue in the third person a story begun by the main actor in the first, and in this case the letters and personal memoranda, which were tolerably abundant for Sir Harry's earlier years, suddenly became very scanty when they were most required. Accordingly, for much of Sir Harry's life I had no more sources to draw on than are accessible to anybody–histories, blue-books, and newspapers. I can only say that in this situation I have done the best I could. My chief difficulty was, of course, in dealing with the time of Sir Harry's command at the Cape. It would have been inconsistent with the scope of the whole book to have attempted a systematic history of the colony or of the operations of the Kafir War. At the same time I could not enable my readers to form an estimate of Sir Harry's conduct at this time without giving them some indication of the circumstances which surrounded him. If I am found by some critics to have subordinated biography too much to history, I can only hope that other critics will console me by finding that I have subordinated history too much to biography.

Amid a certain dearth of materials of a private kind, I do congratulate myself on having been able to use the packet of letters docketed by Sir Harry, "John Bell's and Charlie Beckwith's Letters." General Beckwith was an earlier General Gordon, and his letters are so interesting in matter and so brilliant in expression that one is tempted to wish to see them printed in full. Perhaps some readers of this book may be able to tell me of other letters by the same remarkable man which have been preserved.

The latter part of this book would have been balder than it is, if it had not been for the help I have received from various friends, known and unknown. I must express my thanks in particular to the Misses Payne of Chester, who lent me letters addressed to their father, Major C. W. Meadows Payne; to Mrs. Thorne of Chippenham, who lent me letters addressed to her father, Major George Simmons; to Mrs. Fasson, daughter of Mr. Justice Menzies of the Cape, and Mr. W. F. Collier of Horrabridge, who gave me their reminiscences; to Colonel L. G. Fawkes, R.A., Stephen A. Aveling, Esq., of Rochester, Major J. F. Anderson of Faringdon, R. Morton Middleton, Esq., of Ealing, Captain C. V. Ibbetson of Preston, Mrs. Henry Fawcett, my aunt Mrs. John A. Smith, Mrs. Farebrother of Oxford, Mr. B. Genn of Ely, Mr. Charles Sayle of Cambridge, Mr. G. J. Turner of Lincoln's Inn, Mr. A. E. Barnes of the Local Government Board, the Military Secretary of the War Office, and others, for kind assistance of various kinds. I am indebted to my cousins, Mrs. Lambert of 1, Sloane Gardens, S.W., and C. W. Ford, Esq., for permission to reproduce pictures in their possession, and to General Sir Edward Holdich for much aid and interest in my work in addition to the permission to use his diary of the Boomplaats expedition. Lastly, my thanks are due to my brothers and sisters who assisted in transcribing the Autobiography, and in particular to my sister, Miss M. A. Smith, who did most of the work of preparing the Index.

I shall feel that any labour which I have bestowed on the preparation of this book will be richly repaid if through it Harry and Juana Smith cease to be mere names and become living figures, held in honour and affection by the sons and daughters of the Empire which they served.

G. C. MOORE SMITH.

SHEFFIELD,
    September, 1901.

For some of the corrections now introduced I am indebted to Lieut.-Col. Willoughby Verner, Rifle Brigade, and to the Rev. Canon C. Evans, late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

G. C. M. S.,

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, SHEFFIELD,
    April, 1902.

1 See Appendix vi.

2 Sir Harry's original narrative is not broken into chapters.

3 The Peninsular dates are generally borrowed from A British Rifleman (Major Simmons' diary).

4 Sir Harry's ordinary signature was "H. G. Smith." His letters to his wife were commonly signed "Enrique"; to members of his family, "Harry Smith"; to his friend and interpreter for the Kafir language, Mr. Theophilus Shepstone, "Inkosi" ("Chief"). He addressed Mr. Shepstone as "My dear Sumtseu" ("Hunter").


DATES OF LIEUT.-GENERAL SIR HARRY SMITH'S
COMMISSIONS AND APPOINTMENTS.

REGIMENTAL RANK.

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion 95th Regiment 8 May, 1805
Lieutenant 15 Aug. 1805
Captain 28 Feb. 1812
Major, unattached 29 Dec. 1826
Lieut.-Colonel, unattached 22 July, 1830
Lieut.-Colonel, 3rd Foot 13 May, 1842
Lieut.-Colonel, unattached 25 Aug. 1843
Colonel, 47th Foot 18 Jan. 1847
Colonel, 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade 16 April, 1847
Colonel, 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade 18 Jan. 1855

ARMY RANK.

Major 29 Sept. 1814
Lieut.-Colonel 18 June, 1815
Colonel 10 Jan. 1837
Local rank of Major-General in the East Indies 21 Aug. 1840
Major-General 9 Nov. 1846
Local rank of Lieut.-General in South Africa 1847-1852
Lieut.-General 20 June, 1854

STAFF APPOINTMENTS.

PENINSULAR WAR.

A.D.C. to Colonel T. S. Beckwith Oct. 1810
Brigade Major, 2nd Brigade, Light Division under Major-General Drummond, Major-General Vandeleur, Major-General Skerrett, and Colonel Colborne successively Mar. 1811 to the end of the war, Mar. 1814

WASHINGTON EXPEDITION.

D.A.G. to Major-General R. Ross 1814

NEW ORLEANS EXPEDITION.

A.A.G. to Major-General Sir E. Pakenham 1814
Military Secretary to Major-General Sir J. Lambert 1815

WATERLOO CAMPAIGN.

Brigade-Major, afterwards A.Q.M.G. to 6th Division (Major-General Sir J. Lambert and Major-General Sir Lowry Cole successively) 1815
[Returns to his regiment.]  

OCCUPATION OF FRANCE.

Major de Place of Cambray 1815-1818
[Returns to his regiment.]  

GLASGOW.

Major of Brigade to Major-General Sir T. Reynell (commanding Western District) and Lieut.-General Sir T. Bradford (Commander-in-Chief in Scotland) successively 1819-1825
[Returns to his regiment.]  

NOVA SCOTIA.

A.D.C. to Lieut.-General Sir James Kempt, Governor 1826

JAMAICA.

D.Q.M.G. under Lieut.-General Sir John Keane, Governor 1827

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

D.Q.M.G. under Lieut.-General Sir Lowry Cole, Lieut.-General Sir B. D'Urban, Major-General Sir G. T. Napier, Governors, successively 1828-1840
Chief of the Staff under Sir Benjamin D'Urban in the Kafir War 1835

INDIA.

A.G. to Her Majesty's Forces, under Lieut.-General Sir Jasper Nicolls and Lieut.-General Sir Hugh Gough, Commanders-in-Chief, successively 1840-1845

SIKH WAR.

In Command of the 1st Division Infantry 1845-1846

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

Governor and Commander-in-Chief 1847-1852

HOME STAFF.

In Command of the Western Military District 1853-1854
In Command of the Northern and Midland Military Districts 1854-1859

STEPS IN THE ORDER OF THE BATH.

C.B. for Waterloo 1815
K.C.B. for Maharajpore 1844
G.C.B. for Aliwal and Sobraon 1846

BOOKS USEFUL FOR REFERENCE IN
CONNEXION WITH SIR HARRY SMITH'S LIFE.

An Authentic Narrative of the Proceedings of the Expedition under .. Craufurd until its Arrival at Monte Video, with an Account of the Operations against Buenos Ayres... By an Officer of the Expedition (1808).

SIR WILLIAM F. P. NAPIER: History of the War in the Peninsula.

SIR H. E. MAXWELL: Life of Wellington.

SIR WILLIAM H. COPE: History of the Rifle Brigade (1877).

EDWARD COSTELLO: Adventures of a Soldier (1852).

A British Rifleman (Major George Simmons' Diary), edited by LT.-COLONEL WILLOUGHBY VERNER (1899).

SIR JOHN KINCAID: Random Shots by a Rifleman.

SIR JOHN KINCAID: Adventures in the Rifle Brigade.

Recollections of Rifleman Harris (1848).

SURTEES: Twenty-five Years in the Rifle Brigade (1833).

COLONEL JONATHAN LEACH: Rough Sketches in the Life of an Old Soldier (1831).

A Narrative of the Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans. By an Officer (1821).

CHARLES DALTON: The Waterloo Roll Call (1890).

GEORGE MCC. THEAL: History of South Africa, vol. iv. (1893).

R. GODLONTON: A Narrative of the Irruption of the Kafir Hordes into the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope, 1834-5 (1836).

SIR J. E. ALEXANDER: Narrative of a Voyage, etc. (1837). This work contains in vol. ii. a history of the Kafir War of 1835, with illustrations.

H. CLOETE: The Great Boer Trek.

The War in India. Despatches of Viscount Hardinge, Lord Gough, Major-General Sir Harry Smith, Bart., etc. (1846).

J. D. CUNNINGHAM: History of the Sikhs.

MCGREGOR History of the Sikhs.

GENERAL SIR CHAS. GOUGH and A. D. INNES: The Sikhs and the Sikh Wars (1897).

J. W. CLARK and T. MCK. HUGHES: Life of Adam Sedgwick.

HARRIET WARD: Five Years in Kaffirland.

J. NOBLE: South Africa (1877).

A. WILMOT and J. C. CHASE: Annals of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope (1869).

ALFRED W. COLE: The Cape and the Kaffirs (1852).

W. R. KING: Campaigning in Kaffirland (with illustrations), (1853).

W. A. NEWMAN: Memoir of John Montagu (1855).

Correspondence of General Sir G. Cathcart (1856).

EARL GREY: The Colonial Policy of Lord John Russell's Administration (1853).

BLUE-BOOKS: Cape of Good Hope (1830-1852).

M. MEILLE: Memoir of General Beckwith, C.B. (1873).


CONTENTS.

CHAPTER   PAGE
I. MONTE VIDEO AND BUENOS AYRES, 1806-7 1
II. WITH SIR JOHN MOORE–BATTLE OF CORUÑA, 1808-9 14
III. BACK TO THE PENINSULA UNDER SIR ARTHUR WELLESLEY, 1809 18
IV. CAMPAIGN OF 1810–THE 1ST GERMAN HUSSARS 24
V. CAMPAIGN OF 1810–BATTLE OF THE COA 28
VI. CAMPAIGN OF 1811 41
VII. CAMPAIGN OF 1812: STORMING OF CIUDAD RODRIGO 55
VIII. CAMPAIGN OF 1812: THE STORMING OF BADAJOS–HARRY SMITH'S MARRIAGE 61
IX. CAMPAIGN OF 1812: BATTLE OF SALAMANCA–OCCUPATION OF MADRID–RETREAT TO SALAMANCA 75
X. CAMPAIGN OF 1812: RETREAT TO THE LINES OF TORRES VEDRAS–WINTER OF 1812-13 84
XI. CAMPAIGN OF 1813: BATTLE OF VITTORIA 93
XII. CAMPAIGN OF 1813: ADVANCE TO VERA 104
XIII. CAMPAIGN OF 1813: IN THE PYRENEES–GENERAL SKERRETT–COMBAT OF VERA–FIGHT AT THE BRIDGE, AND DEATH OF CADOUX 113
XIV. CAMPAIGN OF 1813: COLONEL COLBORNE–SECOND COMBAT OF VERA 129
XV. CAMPAIGN OF 1813: BATTLE OF THE NIVELLE 140
XVI. COMBAT OF THE 10TH DECEMBER–HARRY SMITH'S DREAM AND THE DEATH OF HIS MOTHER 152
XVII. CAMPAIGN OF 1814: BATTLE OF ORTHEZ–ANECDOTE OF JUANA SMITH 162
XVIII. CAMPAIGN OF 1814: AT GÉE, NEAR AIRE–BATTLE OF TARBES–BATTLE OF TOULOUSE–END OF THE WAR 170
XIX. HARRY SMITH PARTS FROM HIS WIFE BEFORE STARTING FOR THE WAR IN AMERICA 182
XX. VOYAGE TO BERMUDA–RENDEZVOUS IN THE CHESAPEAKE–BATTLE OF BLADENSBURG AND CAPTURE OF WASHINGTON–HARRY SMITH SENT HOME WITH DISPATCHES 191
XXI. HARRY SMITH ONCE MORE IN ENGLAND–REUNION WITH HIS WIFE IN LONDON–INTERVIEW WITH THE PRINCE REGENT–DINNER AT LORD BATHURST'S–A JOURNEY TO BATH–HARRY SMITH INTRODUCES HIS WIFE TO HIS FATHER–VISIT TO WHITTLESEY–HE RECEIVES ORDERS TO RETURN TO AMERICA UNDER SIR EDWARD PAKENHAM 209
XXII. SAILS WITH SIR EDWARD PAKENHAM ON THE EXPEDITION AGAINST NEW ORLEANS–REVERSE OF 8TH JANUARY, 1815, AND DEATH OF PAKENHAM–SIR JOHN LAMBERT SUCCEEDS TO THE COMMAND, APPOINTS HARRY SMITH HIS MILITARY SECRETARY, AND WITHDRAWS THE FORCE 226
XXIII. CAPTURE OF FORT BOWYER–DISEMBARCATION ON ILE DAUPHINE–END OF THE AMERICAN WAR–VISIT TO HAVANA AND RETURN–VOYAGE TO ENGLAND–NEWS OF NAPOLEON'S RETURN TO POWER–HARRY SMITH AT HIS HOME AT WHITTLESEY 248
XXIV. HARRY SMITH AND HIS WIFE START TOGETHER FOR THE WATERLOO CAMPAIGN–GHENT–BATTLE OF WATERLOO 263
XXV. JUANA'S STORY 281
XXVI. MARCH TO PARIS–HARRY SMITH QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL OF THE RESERVE–HE BECOMES LIEUT.-COLONEL AND C.B.–THE 6TH DIVISION MOVED FROM NEUILLY TO ST. GERMAIN–THE DUC DE BERRI AS A SPORTSMAN–ON THE REDUCTION OF THE 6TH DIVISION HARRY SMITH REJOINS HIS REGIMENT AS CAPTAIN–MARCH TO CAMBRAY–HE IS MADE MAJOR DE PLACE OF THAT TOWN 290
XXVII. CAMBRAY, 1816-1818–SPORT AND GAIETY–THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON–HARRY SMITH RECEIVES A VISIT FROM HIS FATHER 301
XXVIII. RETURN TO ENGLAND (1818)–HARRY SMITH REJOINS HIS REGIMENT–SHORNCLIFFE–GOSPORT–DISCHARGE OF THE PENINSULAR VETERANS 317
XXIX. GLASGOW (1819-1825)–RADICAL DISTURBANCES–HARRY SMITH ONCE MORE ON THE STAFF AS MAJOR OF BRIGADE–GEORGE IV.'S VISIT TO EDINBURGH–HARRY SMITH REVISITS PARIS–HE REJOINS HIS REGIMENT IN IRELAND 324
XXX. 1825-1828: HARRY SMITH ACCOMPANIES HIS REGIMENT TO NOVA SCOTIA–SIR JAMES KEMPT–HARRY SMITH PARTS WITH HIS OLD REGIMENT ON BEING APPOINTED DEPUTY QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL IN JAMAICA–HE HAS TO DEAL WITH AN EPIDEMIC OF YELLOW FEVER AMONG THE TROOPS–APPOINTED DEPUTY QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE 338
XXXI. AFTER STAYING THREE WEEKS AT NASSAU, HARRY SMITH AND HIS WIFE SAIL FOR ENGLAND, AND AFTER A MISERABLE VOYAGE LAND AT LIVERPOOL–HE VISITS LONDON AND WHITTLESEY, AND LEAVES ENGLAND (1829), NOT TO RETURN TILL 1847 351
XXXII. VOYAGE TO THE CAPE–MILITARY DUTIES AND SPORT, 1829-1834–SIR BENJAMIN D'URBAN SUCCEEDS SIR LOWRY COLE AS GOVERNOR OF THE COLONY 359
XXXIII. OUTBREAK OF A KAFIR WAR–HARRY SMITH'S HISTORIC RIDE TO GRAHAMSTOWN–ON HIS ARRIVAL HE PROCLAIMS MARTIAL LAW–PROVIDES FOR THE DEFENCE OF THE TOWN–ATTACKS THE KAFIRS AND RESCUES SEVEN MISSIONARIES 369
XXXIV. HARRY SMITH CHIEF OF THE STAFF UNDER SIR BENJAMIN D'URBAN–HE MAKES TWO FORAYS INTO THE FISH RIVER BUSH AND ONE INTO THE UMDIZINI BUSH–THE FORCE UNDER SIR B. D'URBAN MARCHES FROM FORT WILLSHIRE TO THE POORTS OF THE BUFFALO, FROM WHENCE HARRY SMITH MAKES ANOTHER FORAY 382
XXXV. OVER THE KEI INTO HINTZA'S TERRITORY–WAR DECLARED AGAINST HINTZA–HIS KRAAL BEING DESTROYED THE CHIEF COMES IN, AND AGREES TO THE TERMS OF PEACE–HE REMAINS AS A HOSTAGE WITH THE BRITISH FORCE, WHICH MARCHES BACK TO THE KEI–HARRY SMITH MARCHES UNDER HINTZA'S GUIDANCE INTO HIS TERRITORY TO RECOVER THE STOLEN CATTLE–NEAR THE XABECCA HINTZA TRIES TO ESCAPE, AND IS SHOT 390
XXXVI. MARCH ACROSS THE BASHEE TO THE UMTATA AND BACK TO THE BASHEE–DEATH OF MAJOR WHITE–DIFFICULT MARCH FROM THE BASHEE TO REJOIN SIR B. D'URBAN ON THE KEI–ANNEXATION OF THE TERRITORY CALLED THE "PROVINCE OF QUEEN ADELAIDE," AND FOUNDING OF ITS CAPITAL, "KING WILLIAM'S TOWN "–RETURN OF THE GOVERNOR TO GRAHAMSTOWN 408
XXXVII. HARRY SMITH LEFT IN COMMAND OF THE NEW "PROVINCE OF QUEEN ADELAIDE" AT KING WILLIAM'S TOWN–DEATH OF LIEUTENANT BAILIE–HARRY SMITH JOINED BY HIS WIFE–FORAYS ON THE KAFIRS–CONCLUSION OF PEACE 420
XXXVIII. HARRY SMITH'S ATTEMPTS AT CIVILIZING THE KAFIRS–THE CHIEFS MADE BRITISH MAGISTRATES–A CENSUS TAKEN–A POLICE FORCE ESTABLISHED–A GREAT MEETING OF CHIEFS–WITCHCRAFT FORBIDDEN–A CHIEF PUNISHED FOR DISOBEDIENCE–A REBELLIOUS CHIEF AWED INTO SUBMISSION–AGRICULTURE AND COMMERCE INTRODUCED–NAKEDNESS DISCOUNTENANCED–BURIAL OF THE DEAD ENCOURAGED–BUYING OF WIVES CHECKED–HOPES OF A GENERAL CONVERSION TO CHRISTIANITY 430
XXXIX. LORD GLENELG ORDERS THE ABANDONMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF QUEEN ADELAIDE, AND APPOINTS CAPTAIN STOCKENSTROM TO SUCCEED HARRY SMITH ON THE FRONTIER–GRIEF OF THE KAFIRS AT THE CHANGE–JOURNEY OF HARRY SMITH AND HIS WIFE TO CAPE TOWN–HE IS EXONERATED BY LORD GLENELG, AND RECEIVES TESTIMONIALS FOR HIS SERVICES TO THE COLONY–LEAVES CAPE TOWN JUNE, 1840, ON BEING APPOINTED ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE QUEEN'S ARMY IN INDIA 452
XL. VOYAGE FROM CAPE TOWN TO CALCUTTA–HARRY SMITH'S DISAPPOINTMENT AT NOT RECEIVING THE COMMAND IN THE AFGHAN WAR–HIS CRITICISM OF THE OPERATIONS 469
XLI. SIR HUGH GOUGH SUCCEEDS SIR JASPER NICOLLS AS COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF IN INDIA–AFFAIRS IN GWALIOR–BATTLE OF MAHARAJPORE–HARRY SMITH MADE K.C.B. 480
XLII. AFFAIRS IN THE PUNJAUB–SIR HENRY HARDINGE SUCCEEDS LORD ELLENBOROUGH AS GOVERNOR-GENERAL–OUTBREAK OF THE FIRST SIKH WAR–BATTLE OF MOODKEE 497
XLIII. BATTLE OF FEROZESHAH (OR FEROZESHUHUR) 21ST DECEMBER, 1845, AND RESUMED BATTLE OF 22ND DECEMBER–THE ARMY MOVES INTO POSITION AT SOBRAON 507
XLIV. SIR HARRY SMITH DETACHED FROM THE MAIN ARMY–HE REDUCES THE FORTRESSES OF FUTTEYGHUR AND DHURMCOTE–COMBINES WITH COLONEL PHILLIPS AT JUGRAON, AND AFTER CHANGING HIS ROUTE TO LOODIANA ENCOUNTERS THE ENEMY AT BUDOWAL, AND LOSES SOME PART OF HIS BAGGAGE–HE RELIEVES LOODIANA, AND, BEING REINFORCED AND THE ENEMY HAVING RETREATED, OCCUPIES HIS POSITION AT BUDOWAL 523
XLV. THE BATTLES OF ALIWAL AND SOBRAON–END OF SIR HARRY SMITH'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY 536
XLVI. (Supplementary.) HONOURS AND REWARDS, AND KNITTING OF OLD FRIENDSHIPS 554
XLVII. (Supplementary.) IN ENGLAND ONCE MORE–A SERIES OF OVATIONS–LONDON, ELY, WHITTLESEY, CAMBRIDGE–APPOINTED GOVERNOR OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE 571
XLVIII. (Supplementary.) SOUTH AFRICA IN 1847–SIR HARRY'S RECEPTION AT CAPE TOWN AND ON THE FRONTIER–END OF THE KAFIR WAR–EXTENSION OF THE BOUNDARIES OF THE COLONY AND ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF "BRITISH KAFFRARIA"–VISIT TO THE COUNTRY BEYOND THE ORANGE AND TO NATAL–PROCLAMATION OF THE "ORANGE RIVER SOVEREIGNTY"–TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO CAPE TOWN–DISAFFECTION AMONG THE BOERS IN THE SOVEREIGNTY–EXPEDITION THITHER AND BATTLE OF BOOMPLAATS–RETURN TO CAPE TOWN 582
XLIX. (Supplementary.) THE QUESTION OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY IN THE CAPE COLONY–THE CONVICT QUESTION–KAFIR WAR–RECALL OF SIR HARRY SMITH–HIS DEPARTURE FROM THE CAPE 609
L. (Supplementary.) AGAIN IN ENGLAND–LAST YEARS, 1852-1860 652
APPENDIX I. –DIARY OF THE EXPEDITION TO MONTE VIDEO, ETC., 1806-7 691
APPENDIX II. –SOME FAMILY LETTERS PRESERVED BY HARRY SMITH WITH PARTICULAR CARE 700
APPENDIX III. –MEMORANDUM ADDRESSED TO SIR B. D'URBAN ON THE DIET AND TREATMENT OF SOLDIERS IN CONFINEMENT 715
APPENDIX IV. –EXTRACTS FROM HARRY SMITH'S LETTERS TO HIS WIFE DURING THE KAFIR WAR; 1835 718
APPENDIX V. –ADDRESS OF COLONEL SMITH TO THE CAFFER CHIEFS, 7TH JANUARY, 1836 760
APPENDIX VI. –EXTRACTS FROM SIR HARRY SMITH'S LETTERS FROM INDIA, TO HIS SISTER, MRS. SARGANT 766
APPENDIX VII. –SIR HARRY SMITH'S RECALL FROM THE CAPE–
A. Earl Grey's Despatch
B. Sir Harry Smith's "Memoranda" in Reply
 
782
787
APPENDIX VIII. –SIR HARRY SMITH'S PATERNAL AND MATERNAL ANCESTRY 794
INDEX   795

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

SIR HARRY SMITH
(From a picture painted by Levin about 1856.)
Frontispiece
SIR HARRY SMITH'S BIRTHPLACE, WHITTLESEY
(From a photograph by A. Gray, Whittlesey, 1900.)
To face p. 156
JUANA SMITH
(From a picture painted in Paris in 1815.)
218
ST. MARY'S, WHITTLESEY
(From a photograph by A. Gray, Whittlesey, 1900.)
260
LIEUT.-COLONEL HARRY SMITH
(From a picture painted in Paris in 1815.)
294
JOHN SMITH (SIR HARRY SMITH'S FATHER)
(From a picture painted by J. P. Hunter in 1837.)
314
CAPE TOWN AND TABLE MOUNTAIN
(From a lithograph, 1832.)
370
MAP TO ILLUSTRATE THE SUTLEJ CAMPAIGN, 1845-6 498
PLAN OF THE BATTLE OF ALIWAL 536
"ALIWAL," SIR HARRY SMITH'S CHARGER.
(From a picture painted by A. Cooper, R.A., 1847.)
576
GOVERNMENT HOUSE, CAPE TOWN
(From a lithograph, 1832.)
584
SOUTH AFRICA, 1847-1854. 594
PLAN OF THE FIELD OF ACTION AT BOOMPLAATS 600
MAP OF THE EASTERN FRONTIER OF THE COLONY OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE (SEAT OF THE KAFIR WAR, 1850-1853) To face p. 620
LADY SMITH
(From a drawing by Julian C. Brewer, 1854.)
658
SIR HARRY'S CHAPEL (IN ST. MARY'S CHURCH, WHITTLESEY)
(From a water-colour by Mrs. B. S. Ward.)
684

 

On the Cover.  

ARMS GRANTED TO SIR HARRY SMITH IN 1846.

They are thus described by Sir Bernard Burke:–

Arms– Argent, on a chevron between two martlets in chief gules, and upon a mount vert in base, an elephant proper, a fleur-de-lis between two lions rampant, of the first: from the centre-chief, pendant by a riband, gules, fimbriated azure, a representation of the Waterloo medal.
Crest– Upon an Eastern crown or, a lion rampant argent, supporting a lance proper, therefrom flowing to the sinister, a pennon gules, charged with two palm-branches, in saltier, or.

The supporters are a soldier of the Rifle Brigade and a soldier of the 52nd Regiment.


This book has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the Celebration of Women Writers.

The illustration of British Riflemen of the 60th Regiment & 95th Regiment is from coloured lithograph vignettes by J. C. Stadler after Charles Hamilton Smith from Charles Hamilton Smith's Costumes of the Army of the British Empire, according to the last regulations 1812, published by Colnaghi & Co. 1812-1815.