A Celebration of Women Writers

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[Frontispiece]


'CHARLES THE KING WALKED FOR THE LAST TIME THROUGH THE STREETS OF LONDON.'


[Title Page]

AN
ISLAND STORY

A HISTORY OF ENGLAND
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

BY H. E. MARSHALL

WITH PICTURES
BY A. S. FORREST

NEW YORK
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS


Copyright, 1920, by
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
All Rights Reserved


TO
SPEN AND VEDA


HOW THIS BOOK CAME TO BE WRITTEN

"WHAT a funny letter, Daddy," said Spen, as he looked at the narrow envelope which had just arrived, and listened to the crackle of the thin paper.

"Do you think so?" said Daddy. "It is from home."

"From home!" said Spen, laughing, "why, Daddy, this is home."

"I mean from the old country, Spen."

"The old country, Daddy?" said Veda, leaving her dolls and coming to lean against her father's knee, "the old country? What do you mean?"

"I mean, 'the little island in the west' to which we belong, and where I used to live," said Daddy.

"But this is an island, a great big one, Mother says, so how can we belong to a little island?" asked Spen.

"Well, we do–at least, the big island and the little island belong to each other."

"Oh, Daddy, do 'splain yourself, you are not 'splaining yourself at all," said Veda.

"Well," said Daddy with a sigh, "long, long ago—"

"Oh!" said Spen, "it's a story," and he settled himself to listen.

"Yes," said Daddy, "it's a story, and a very long one, too. I think I must ask some one else to tell it to you."

And Daddy did ask some one else, and here is the story as it was told to Spen and Veda. I hope it will interest not only the children in this big island, but some of the children in "the little island in the west," too.

I must tell you, though, that this is not a history lesson, but a story-book. There are many facts in school histories, that seem to children to belong to lessons only. Some of these you will not find here. But you will find some stories that are not to be found in your school books,–stories which wise people say are only fairy tales and not history. But it seems to me that they are part of Our Island Story, and ought not to be forgotten, any more than those stories about which there is no doubt.

So, although I hope you will not put this book beside your school books, but quite at the other end of the shelf, beside Robinson Crusoe and A Noah's Ark Geography, I hope, too, that it will help you to like your school history books better than ever, and that, when you grow up, you will want to read for yourselves the beautiful big histories which have helped me to write this little book for little people.

Then, when you find out how much has been left untold in this little book, do not be cross, but remember that, when you were very small, you would not have been able to understand things that seem quite simple and very interesting to you as you grow older. Remember, too, that I was not trying to teach you, but only to tell a story.

H. E. MARSHALL.


CONTENTS

CHAP.   PAGE
1. THE STORIES OF ALBION AND BRUTUS 1
2. THE COMING OF THE ROMANS 5
3. THE ROMANS COME AGAIN 10
4. HOW CALIGULA CONQUERED BRITAIN, AND HOW CARACTACUS REFUSED TO BE CONQUERED 13
5. THE STORY OF A WARRIOR QUEEN 17
6. THE LAST OF THE ROMANS 22
7. THE STORY OF ST. ALBAN 26
8. VORTIGERN AND KING CONSTANS 31
9. THE STORY OF THE COMING OF HENGIST AND HORSA 36
10. HENGIST'S TREACHERY 41
11. THE STORY OF HOW THE GIANT'S DANCE WAS BROUGHT TO BRITAIN 45
12. THE COMING OF ARTHUR 51
13. THE FOUNDING OF THE ROUND TABLE 54
14. THE STORY OF GREGORY AND THE PRETTY CHILDREN 58
15. HOW KING ALFRED LEARNED TO READ 64
16. KING ALFRED IN THE COWHERD'S COTTAGE 68
17. MORE ABOUT ALFRED THE GREAT 73
18. ETHELRED THE UNREADY 77
19. HOW EDMUND IRONSIDE FOUGHT FOR THE CROWN 81
20. CANUTE AND THE WAVES 85
21. EDWARD THE CONFESSOR 88
22. HAROLD 94
23. THE BATTLE OF STAMFORD BRIDGE 101
24. THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS 108
25. WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR–THE STORY OF HEREWARD THE WAKE 115
26. WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR–DEATH OF THE KING 121
27. THE STORY OF WILLIAM THE RED 125
28. HENRY I.–THE STORY OF THE "WHITE SHIP" 129
29. THE STORY OF KING STEPHEN 137
30. HENRY PLANTAGENET–THE STORY OF GILBERT AND ROHESIA 141
31. HENRY PLANTAGENET–THE STORY OF THOMAS À BECKET 145
32. HENRY PLANTAGENET–THE STORY OF THE CONQUEST OF IRELAND 152
33. THE STORY OF RICHARD CŒUR DE LION
34. RICHARD CŒUR DE LION–THE STORY OF HOW BLONDEL FOUND THE KING 162
35. JOHN LACKLAND–THE STORY OF PRINCE ARTHUR 168
36. JOHN LACKLAND–THE STORY OF THE GREAT CHARTER 171
37. HENRY III. OF WINCHESTER–THE STORY OF HUBERT DE BURGH 179
38. HENRY III. OF WINCHESTER–THE STORY OF SIMON DE MONTFORT 184
39. HENRY III.–THE STORY OF THE POISONED DAGGER 189
40. EDWARD I.–THE LITTLE WAR OF CHALONS 193
41. EDWARD I.–THE LAWGIVER–THE STORY OF THE FIRST PRINCE OF WALES 196
42. EDWARD I.–THE HAMMER OF THE SCOTS 200
43. EDWARD II. OF CAERNARVON–THE STORY OF KING ROBERT THE BRUCE AND BOHUN 209
44. EDWARD II. OF CAERNARVON–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF BANNOCKBURN 209
45. EDWARD III. OF WINDSOR–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF SLUYS 212
46. EDWARD III. OF WINDSOR–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF CRECY 216
47. EDWARD III. OF WINDSOR–THE STORY OF THE SIEGE OF CALAIS 223
48. EDWARD III. OF WINDSOR–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF POITIERS 230
49. RICHARD II. OF BORDEAUX–THE STORY OF WAT TYLER'S REBELLION 234
50. HOW KING RICHARD II. LOST HIS THRONE 242
51. HENRY IV. OF BOLINGBROKE–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF SHREWSBURY 245
52. HENRY IV. OF BOLINGBROKE–THE STORY OF HOW PRINCE HAL WAS SENT TO PRISON 249
53. HENRY V. OF MONMOUTH–THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF AGINCOURT 252
54. HENRY VI. OF WINDSOR–THE STORY OF THE MAID OF ORLEANS 257
55. HENRY VI. OF WINDSOR–THE RED ROSE AND THE WHITE 263
56. EDWARD IV.–THE STORY OF QUEEN MARGARET AND THE ROBBERS 269
57. EDWARD IV.–THE STORY OF THE KING-MAKER 272
58. EDWARD V.–THE STORY OF THE KING WHO WAS NEVER CROWNED 277
59. RICHARD III.–THE STORY OF THE TWO LITTLE PRINCES IN THE TOWER 283
60. HENRY VII.–THE STORY OF A MAKE-BELIEVE PRINCE 286
61. HENRY VII.–THE STORY OF ANOTHER MAKE-BELIEVE PRINCE 290
62. HENRY VIII.–THE STORY OF THE FIELD OF THE CLOTH OF GOLD 296
63. HENRY VIII.–HOW THE KING BECAME THE DEFENDER OF THE FAITH AND HOW THE GREAT CARDINAL DIED 303
64. HENRY VIII.–THE STORY OF THE KING'S SIX WIVES 309
65. EDWARD VI.–THE STORY OF A BOY KING 313
66. THE STORY OF LADY JANE GREY 318
67. MARY I.–HOW THE PRINCESS ELIZABETH BECAME A PRISONER 322
68. MARY I.–HOW A CANDLE WAS LIT IN ENGLAND WHICH HAS NEVER BEEN PUT OUT 327
69. ELIZABETH–HOW THE IMPRISONED PRINCESS BECAME A QUEEN 330
70. ELIZABETH–THE STORY OF A MOST UNHAPPY QUEEN 333
71. ELIZABETH–THE STORY OF HOW ENGLAND WAS SAVED FROM THE SPANIARDS 338
72. ELIZABETH–THE STORY OF SIR WALTER RALEIGH 342
73. ELIZABETH–THE STORY OF THE QUEEN'S FAVORITE 346
74. JAMES VI. OF SCOTLAND, I. OF ENGLAND–THE STORY OF GUY FAWKES 352
75. JAMES VI. OF SCOTLAND, I. OF ENGLAND–THE STORY OF THE "MAYFLOWER" 358
76. CHARLES I.–HOW A WOMAN STRUCK A BLOW FOR FREEDOM 363
77. CHARLES I.–THE STORY OF NOW THE KING AND THE PARLIAMENT QUARRELED AND AT LAST FOUGHT 367
78. CHARLES I.–THE STORY OF HOW THE KING WAS BROUGHT TO HIS DEATH 372
79. THE COMMONWEALTH–THE ADVENTURES OF A PRINCE 376
80. THE COMMONWEALTH–THE LORD PROTECTOR 381
81. CHARLES II.–HOW THE KING CAME TO HIS OWN, AND HOW DEATH WALKED IN THE STREETS OF LONDON 385
82. CHARLES II.–THE STORY OF HOW LONDON WAS BURNED 390
83. JAMES II. OF ENGLAND AND VII. OF SCOTLAND–THE FIERY CROSS 394
84. JAMES II. OF ENGLAND AND VII. OF SCOTLAND–THE STORY OF KING MONMOUTH 398
85. JAMES II. OF ENGLAND AND VII. OF SCOTLAND–THE STORY OF THE SEVEN BISHOPS 400
86. JAMES II. OF ENGLAND AND VII. OF SCOTLAND–WILLIAM THE DELIVERER 405
87. WILLIAM III. AND MARY II.–THE STORY OF BRAVE LONDONDERRY 408
88. WILLIAM III. AND MARY II.–THE STORY OF A SAD DAY IN A HIGHLAND GLEN 411
89. ANNE–HOW THE UNION JACK WAS MADE 415
90. GEORGE I.–THE STORY OF THE EARL OF MAR'S HUNTING PARTY 419
91. GEORGE II.–THE STORY OF BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE 424
92. GEORGE II.–THE STORY OF FLORA MACDONALD 429
93. GEORGE II.–THE STORY OF THE BLACK HOLE OF CALCUTTA 434
94. GEORGE II.–THE STORY OF HOW CANADA WAS WON 437
95. GEORGE III.–THE STORY OF HOW AMERICA WAS LOST 442
96. GEORGE III.–A STORY OF THE SPINNING-WHEEL 448
97. GEORGE III.–ENGLAND EXPECTS THAT EVERY MAN WILL DO HIS DUTY 453
98. GEORGE III.–THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO 459
99. GEORGE IV.–THE FIRST GENTLEMAN IN EUROPE 463
100. WILLIAM IV.–THE STORY OF TWO PEACEFUL VICTORIES 466
101. VICTORIA–THE GIRL QUEEN 471
102. VICTORIA–WHEN BREAD WAS DEAR 474
103. VICTORIA–PEACE 477
104. VICTORIA–WAR 480
105. VICTORIA–THE LAND OF SNOW 487
106. VICTORIA–THE SIEGE OF DELHI 491
107. VICTORIA–THE PIPES AT LUCKNOW 496
108. VICTORIA–UNDER THE SOUTHERN CROSS 500
109. VICTORIA–FROM CANNIBAL TO CHRISTIAN 505
110. VICTORIA–BOER AND BRITON 509
111. EDWARD VII–THE PEACEMAKER 517
112. GEORGE V.–ARMED PEACE 524
113. WORLD WAR 532
114. THE HOPE OF THE FUTURE 541
  LIST OF KINGS FROM EDWARD THE CONFESSOR 549
  INDEX 551

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

"Charles the King walked for the last time through the streets of London" Frontispiece
  AT PAGE
"The shore was covered with men ready for battle" 6
"Will you follow me, men?" 20
"Rowena came into the room carrying a beautiful golden cup" 40
"He stood there holding the magic sword in his hand" 52
"Alfred found much pleasure in reading" 64
"It seemed as if he rode alone to defy the whole English army" 112
"The little boy knelt before the King and stammered out the story" 134
"Richard went away to Palestine" 156
"The great Charter was sealed with the King's seal" 176
"The Count rode again and again at Edward till his lance was splintered in his hand" 194
"Bruce lifted his battle-axe high in the air, then brought it crashing down upon the helmet of Bohun" 208
"The King made the Black Prince a Knight of the Order of the Garter" 222
"'For your contempt and disobedience I send you to prison,' said Judge Gascoigne" 250
"One after another all the nobles plucked red or white roses and put them in their caps" 264
"The days seemed very long and dreary to the two little boys" 284
"Henry sent Wolsey away from Court" 308
"For nineteen years this poor Queen was kept in prison" 336
"'There is time to finish the game and beat the Spaniards too,' said Drake" 340
"Quickly pulling off his cloak he threw it upon the ground" 344
"Stern men with drawn swords closed in upon him" 356
"A band of exiles moor'd their bark on the wild New England shore" 362
"The Deliverer had come" 406
"The Union Jack" 418
"They took a sad farewell of each other" 432
"Richard's shop soon became the fashion" 450
"'They have done for me at last, Hardy,' said Nelson" 456
"Not till after the battle did Blücher and Wellington meet" 462
"The ships were called the Terror and the Erebus" 488
"'Dinna ye hear them! dinna ye hear them!'" 498
"The Boer leaders were blindfolded and guarded by soldiers of the Black Watch" 512

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

This book has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the
Celebration of Women Writers.
Initial text entry and proof-reading of this book were the work of volunteers at
Ambleside Online.

Please note that numbering of chapters has been modernized for the convenience of modern readers. The original chapter numbers followed the convention I, II, III ... XCIV. With this exception, we have attempted to recreate the original style and layout. Illustrations may vary somewhat in size, color, and placement from the original.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom