A Celebration of Women Writers

"Lectures to Women." by Miss Susan B. Anthony.
Publication: Eagle, Mary Kavanaugh Oldham, ed. The Congress of Women: Held in the Woman's Building, World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, U. S. A., 1893. Chicago, Ill: Monarch Book Company, 1894. p. 787.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

[Page 787] 

LECTURES TO WOMEN.

By MISS SUSAN B. ANTHONY.

MISS SUSAN B. ANTHONY.
Miss Anthony appeared at the Congress and spoke on more than one occasion, but, as she did not read from manuscript, and spoke entirely without notes, it is impossible to give here any one of her addresses. Her appearance was, on every occasion, the signal for much applause, and she was listened to with the greatest interest whatever the theme to which her attention was given. Despite her advanced age, she exhibited her old-time vigor and earnestness, and evidently enjoyed the Congress very much, as certainly she added to the enjoyment of others.

Speaking in almost every state in the Union as she has done, and before large audiences, there were still many thousands of people who were curious to see her but who had never had the opportunity before to look upon Miss Anthony, and whenever it was announced that she would speak there was certain to be a crowded Auditorium. Among the many famous women brought together by the events of the Exposition, she was at all times a conspicuous and interesting figure. Her lecture on "Woman's Influence versus Political Power" was a specimen of that line of reasoning so generally employed by the advocates of woman suffrage in pleading for equal rights. It was argued that woman's influence had accomplished more in the field of reform than man, backed by political power, had been able to achieve, and that such power, given to woman, would be used to far greater advantage and to the glory of the nation. Miss Anthony's other address, "Benefits of Organization" was a plea to the women of America to unite in working for their rights, and so make a formidable and impressive showing in demanding recognition from the law-making bodies of the country.


[Page 787] 

Miss Susan B. Anthony was born at South Adams, Berkshire County, Mass., February 15, 1820. Has spent most of her life in New York. Her parents were Lucy Read and Daniel Anthony. Her father, being a Friend (Hicksite Quaker), had his children educated mainly in private schools at home. Her last school days were spent at Deborah Moulson's Quaker Boarding School in Philadelphia; she taught in the district schools in New York for fifteen years; has traveled in nearly every state in the union lecturing on woman's need of the ballot as a means of protection to her person and property, and of securing to her equal chances in education and in the world of work. She advocates equal rights for women, civil, political, educational, industrial, social and moral. Her principal literary works are the publication of The Revolution, a weekly woman's-rights paper, and "The History of Woman's Suffrage" in three large volumes. Miss Anthony has carved for herself, through an independent, and for years a most unpopular, course, a monument of esteem, respect and veneration in the hearts of the women of the world. In religious faith she is a Hicksite-Quaker or Friend. Miss Anthony took active interest in all congresses held in connection with the Columbia Exposition, and made two addresses in the Woman's Building on the following subjects: "Woman's Influence versus Political Power" and "Benefits of Organization." As she invariably speaks without notes it was impossible to secure either address for publication. Her postoffice address is Rochester, N.Y.

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Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

This chapter has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the
Celebration of Women Writers.
Initial text entry and proof-reading of this chapter were the work of volunteer
Susan Wais.

Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom